Europe travel – Nomas Solo http://nomassolo.com/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 03:30:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nomassolo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Europe travel – Nomas Solo http://nomassolo.com/ 32 32 Trip to Europe: Picturesque hideaways on the Greek islands of Mykonos and Antiparos https://nomassolo.com/trip-to-europe-picturesque-hideaways-on-the-greek-islands-of-mykonos-and-antiparos/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 19:00:50 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/trip-to-europe-picturesque-hideaways-on-the-greek-islands-of-mykonos-and-antiparos/ Stunning view from the Bill and Coo Gastronomy Project sunset lounge. Photo / supplied TRAVEL GUIDE TO MYKONOS AND ANTIPAROS If you’re planning a dream trip to Greece, keep these Mykonos and Antiparos hotspots on your radar, writes Amira Hashish Mykonos offers a glamorous gateway to neighboring Antiparos, the destination that is fast becoming the […]]]>

Stunning view from the Bill and Coo Gastronomy Project sunset lounge. Photo / supplied

TRAVEL GUIDE TO MYKONOS AND ANTIPAROS

If you’re planning a dream trip to Greece, keep these Mykonos and Antiparos hotspots on your radar, writes Amira Hashish

Mykonos offers a glamorous gateway to neighboring Antiparos, the destination that is fast becoming the most coveted of the Greek islands for connoisseurs, including dedicated vacation owners Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson or recent visitors Eva Mendes and Ryan Gosling. Here are some of the places to check when jumping between the two star escapes.

Mykonos offers a glamorous gateway.  Photo / 123rf
Mykonos offers a glamorous gateway. Photo / 123rf

WHERE TO STAY

The Antiparos Rooster
This unbeatably chic hotel sets the standard for the new kind of travel experience and puts Antiparos on the map. Impeccably designed to respect its nature-filled surroundings, this is the place you dream of when thinking of the authentic Greek island getaway. Slow living is embraced through sustainability, organic food, wellness and fun.

For a chic setting and island tranquility, The Rooster Hotel in Antiparos ticks all the boxes.  Photo / supplied
For a chic setting and island tranquility, The Rooster Hotel in Antiparos ticks all the boxes. Photo / supplied

Owner and founder Athanasia Comninos is originally from Athens but was drawn to the magic of Antiparos with its sense of tranquility, warmth, beautiful scenery and sea views. She bought a house on Livadia beach , next to what now houses The Rooster, then painstakingly built his dream hotel with a series of private suites in the grounds. Many with their own private plunge pools and rainforest-style outdoor showers, they’re a far cry from ordinary hotel rooms. Instead, there’s the feeling of being at your own tasteful beach house.

The Rooster Hotel boasts sea views and a secluded location.  Photo / supplied
The Rooster Hotel boasts sea views and a secluded location. Photo / supplied

At the heart of The Rooster is The House of Healing; a thoughtful twist on a spa with a rotating series of wellness gurus at your fingertips. Stroll along the path to savor a day at the Aegean Sea. You will receive a picnic to take to the beach as well as a parasol and rattan chairs to settle in at the place of your choice. Evenings are made for the open-air restaurant, which sparkles as the sun sets. Needless to say, all the ingredients are local. Even the bread is baked a stone’s throw away. Head straight to Coq Antiparos to discover this special destination, theroosterantiparos.com

A range of spa treatments are offered at The Rooster Hotel.  Photo / supplied
A range of spa treatments are offered at The Rooster Hotel. Photo / supplied

Village of Panormos
Mykonos may have a reputation for being a party island, but there are also charming and rustic neighborhoods to explore. Panormos Village is ideally located in the north for a slower pace and access to some of the best beaches on the island, including the crystal clear waters of Panormos Bay. The family-run hotel offers breathtaking panoramic views from its dazzling pool, restaurant and suites. The rooms have been cleverly redesigned to pay homage to Cycladic design using natural materials. Mykonian stone architecture combined with a palette of neutrals sets a soothing tone and strikes the perfect balance between contemporary and local. One of the most coveted beach clubs, Principote Mykonos, which attracts a host of celebrities, is right next door, but the real gem to explore is Kiki’s. The beach restaurant, which sits on the edge of a cliff, is about a 20-minute walk or a short drive from Panormos Village, panormosvillage.com.

With its Mykonos stone architecture and soothing neutral colors, the village of Panomos is the perfect place to unwind.  Photo / supplied
With its Mykonos stone architecture and soothing neutral colors, the village of Panomos is the perfect place to unwind. Photo / supplied

Bill & Coo
For those who want to be in the heart of the action in Mykonos Town, Bill & Coo Suites is the perfect place. The hotel is centered around the pool deck, which is a fabulous place to enjoy a cocktail overlooking the island.

Bill and Coo offers city suites and private beach options.  Photo / supplied
Bill and Coo offers city suites and private beach options. Photo / supplied

It houses the gastronomic project with a series of Michelin-starred chefs including residences of renowned chefs Arnaud Bignon, Alexandros Tsiotinis and Luca Piscazzi. A short transfer will take you to its sister beachfront hotel, Bill & Coo Coast. With only a handful of suites on-site, some with their own private plunge pools and a plunge pool near the all-day cafe and bar, this property was designed with privacy in mind. It is also the location of the Beefbar restaurant, which has been so successful that it now has outposts all over the world. It recently underwent a redesign taking inspiration from the Aegean Sea and Delos, the uninhabited island and World Heritage Site it overlooks, known for being the birthplace of the ancient Greek god Apollo and the goddess Artemis, bill-coo-hotel.com.

Bill and Coo Gastronomy Project on Mykonos has hosted a range of starred chefs.  Photo / supplied
Bill and Coo Gastronomy Project on Mykonos has hosted a range of starred chefs. Photo / supplied

WHERE TO EAT AND DRINK

In Mykonos

Kiki’s Tavern

This is the most memorable lunch you will have in Mykonos. Reservations aren’t a thing but get moving, introduce yourself to the owner (you’ll recognize him when you see him), soak up the sparkling views of the heart-shaped bay and relax with a complimentary cup of rosé while you wait. Order just about anything on the menu and you won’t be disappointed. All food is cooked without electricity in this beautifully authentic beach hut which has the perfect view. Take a dip in the sea, which flows below the terrace, watching the sun go down.

Noema

Hidden in the historic alleys of Mykonos Town, Nōema is an ode to the culinary heritage of this legendary Greek island with some very contemporary twists. As in a typical Cycladic house, social life is centered around the Avli, a hidden courtyard with loosely defined areas for eating, drinking and dancing. In the open kitchen, culinary director Athinagoras Kostakos is pioneering a new Cycladic cuisine.

The elegant central courtyard of Noema Restaurant, Mykonos.  Photo / supplied
The elegant central courtyard of Noema Restaurant, Mykonos. Photo / supplied

The menu celebrates land and sea. Lamb, goat cheese, caper leaves, lobster, octopus and cockles come from hand-picked suppliers throughout the Aegean archipelago. The ingredients are dried, fermented, sun-dried and flame-roasted according to centuries-old traditions, but composed in unexpected ways. The perfect place to put on your fanciest outfit and soak up a performative feast.

Goat cheese, lobster and octopus are some of the delicacies on the menu at Noema Restaurant in Mykonos Town.  Photo / supplied
Goat cheese, lobster and octopus are some of the delicacies on the menu at Noema Restaurant in Mykonos Town. Photo / supplied

Scorpios

A beach club to be seen in, Scorpios leads the way in clean Mykonian design in a lively setting. Perched on a scenic southern tip of the island, the stretch of coastline is a fun place to soak up the Cycladic sunshine.

At the southern tip of Mykonos Island, Scorpios Restaurant is a quaint place to grab a bite to eat.  Photo / Vivek Vadoliya, Space Scorpions
At the southern tip of Mykonos Island, Scorpios Restaurant is a quaint place to grab a bite to eat. Photo / Vivek Vadoliya, Space Scorpions

The diet is centered around the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle. Stay until the evening when the club atmosphere takes over. Scorpios is so devoted to music that he even has his own record label. If you really don’t want to leave after a day of partying, there’s the neighboring Soho Roc House hotel.

The Scorpios Beach Club offers moments of relaxation during the day and a club atmosphere at night.  Photo / Vivek Vadoliya, Space Scorpions
The Scorpios Beach Club offers moments of relaxation during the day and a club atmosphere at night. Photo / Vivek Vadoliya, Space Scorpions

In Antiparos

Kalokeri

Greek gastronomy in the heart of the city. An evening of watching passersby rave about the local shops is made all the more enjoyable with truly delicious home-cooked meals. The owner and chef is passionate about Cycladic recipes and you can taste them with every bite. His sea bass dish, complete with perfectly cooked potatoes and vegetables, is hard to beat. A discreet gem.

Sapou
Small plates to share on the port with a cuisine that goes beyond the Greek tradition. A good place to watch the boats dance with a buzz.

Climataria Tavern
A traditional Greek taverna in the middle of town with a beautiful large patio. Stone-slab floors and wooden tables sit under the shade of bright pink bougainvillea. The perfect setting for a long lunch or a lazy dinner.

Boats at the port of Antiparos island.  Photo / 123rf
Boats at the port of Antiparos island. Photo / 123rf

Peramataki Tavern
A little set back from Soros Beach, this quiet, rustic taverna serves delicious local dishes. Or if you prefer a more contemporary option, head to the restaurant at the Soros Beach club.

beach house
In Apantima Cove, on the island’s most sheltered beach, this all-day dining restaurant serves up food at the height of the view.

Sunset Deseo
Looking for the best laid-back bar to watch the sunset? That’s it. Order your favorite cocktail and marvel at the colorful hues of the sky as day turns to night.

WHERE TO EXPLORE

The island of Paros, the big sister of Antiparos, is 50 minutes by ferry from Mykonos and only seven minutes by ferry from Antiparos. It’s a great day trip. Naoussa is the main port and where you will find the most stylish restaurants including Barbarossa, Siparos or Yemeni. With its sandy coves and small bays, the famous beach of Kolymbithres is the ideal place to spend a dream day by the sea; Taverna Anemos or Taverna Kolibithres are your lunch spots.

The island of Paros, the big sister of Antiparos, is 50 minutes by ferry from Mykonos.  Photo / 123rf
The island of Paros, the big sister of Antiparos, is 50 minutes by ferry from Mykonos. Photo / 123rf

For more Greece travel ideas, see visitgreece.gr

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Europe Travel: How to Plan a Portugal Road Trip from Lisbon to Porto https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-how-to-plan-a-portugal-road-trip-from-lisbon-to-porto/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 17:10:51 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-how-to-plan-a-portugal-road-trip-from-lisbon-to-porto/ The views from Portugal’s coastal road may surprise you. Photo/Getty Images for the trip Portugal’s roads are considered some of the best in the world, making it a wonderful destination for a driving holiday. There’s no need to have a car while in Lisbon or Porto, as public transport is excellent and the hop-on hop-off […]]]>

The views from Portugal’s coastal road may surprise you. Photo/Getty Images for the trip

Portugal’s roads are considered some of the best in the world, making it a wonderful destination for a driving holiday.

There’s no need to have a car while in Lisbon or Porto, as public transport is excellent and the hop-on hop-off bus is easy for sightseeing. But a leisurely road trip between these two ancient cities (about 5.5 hours by road) is the perfect way to discover the townships and sights along the Atlantic coast. Start in Lisbon and head north.

After spending time seeing the highlights of Lisbon (see below), take the metro back to the airport to pick up your rental car – there’s plenty to choose from and no need to navigate out of town town. Book in advance – the earlier the cheaper.

Getting out of the narrow exit lane of the rental parking lot requires caution and attention, especially with left-hand drive that’s likely manual – two things that may be unfamiliar. Don’t let that put you off. Take photos of all aspects of the car before jumping in, and again at the end of the trip before handing over the keys, as an indisputable record of the condition of the car.

Driving on Portuguese roads is safe and systematic. Most auto-estrada highways are multi-lane toll roads that get you from A to B quickly and easily – well worth paying for, although there are also free routes. Rent a transponder from the rental company and drive straight on the “Via Verde” lanes; tolls are automatically debited from your credit card. Waze GPS navigation app is worth downloading.

Here are the must-see highlights to add to your road trip itinerary.

Lisbon

With a long and rich history, prominent architecture and remarkable museums, Lisbon is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Portuguese mosaic pavements originated here and examples of decorative ceramic tiles are everywhere. Getting around the city is easy (metro, trams, trains, ferries). Buy a Lisboa Card to travel for free and access various tourist options.

Lisbon is a hilly city, built in a succession of terraces overlooking the coast. Resolutely modern while retaining a strong air of yesteryear, breathtaking panoramas are offered to you. For a small fee, lifts and funiculars transport those with tired legs up or down. Boats and seafood are plentiful, and the Vasco da Gama bridge spanning the Tagus is the longest in the European Union.

Visit the impressive Belém Tower, the Monastery of Jeronimos and the old quarter of Alfama featuring Roman and Moorish architecture amidst narrow streets.

Commerce Square sits proudly in the Baixa, the heart of the city. Rossio Square is bustling, with cafes, fountains and a wave-patterned sidewalk that is both striking and disorienting.

Bacalhoa Buddha Eden

One hour north of Lisbon, this oriental garden – the largest in Europe – was created in response to the destruction of the Banyan Buddhas in Afghanistan. It’s easy to spend a morning in peace and quiet strolling through the 35 hectares of gardens featuring Buddhas, pagodas, terracotta statues and sculptures. Open every day except Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Blue Buddha Garden: A copy of the Terracotta Army, at Bacalhoa Buddha Eden.  Photo / 123RF
Blue Buddha Garden: A copy of the Terracotta Army, at Bacalhoa Buddha Eden. Photo / 123RF

Obidos

Drive 20 minutes north from the Buddha Eden Garden to Obidos, a charming medieval town with an imposing castle. Park by the aqueduct (pay and display) and take a short stroll to the walled old town which reveals narrow lanes draped in cascading color, faded-fronted shops and restaurants, and beautiful wood-panelled churches and exquisite tiles. Choose a cafe on a shady cobbled street and watch the world go by over cold beers and simple, tasty food. The enchanting 13th-century castle operates as a luxury hotel, so stay a night if your budget and time allow.

Barge

Head west to the Silver Coast, where a three-night stay is ideal at this surprisingly large maritime hub. Locals love to entertain and restaurants cook up fresh seafood in the outer lanes. Eat at Os Americano (refined cuisine and exceptional service); enjoy casual drinks at Tres As Bar (friendly and atmospheric with a vintage flavor); taste the pastries of the various bakeries (the embarrassment of the choice). Try to stay upwind of the big sardine factory!

Peniche has a history of bobbin lace. There is a small museum dedicated to this intricate craft and locals proudly demonstrate in the square. The fortress was once a political prison, renowned for two daring and successful escapes; an impressive setting that combines a slice of history with fabulous panoramic views.

Early morning sea fog often fills the waterfront, but once the sun is out, head to one of the excellent beaches for surfing, swimming, paddleboarding, and more. Beware, the Atlantic Ocean can be cold even in the height of summer.

Take a memorable day boat trip to Berlenga Island, a marine reserve of natural beauty and rich history. Walking trails, caves, a lighthouse, turquoise water and a spectacular fort that offers inimitable accommodation and a cafe. Even in perfect weather, be prepared for roller coaster sea swells – second nature for keen boaters and well worth the effort even if you’re a little nervous on the water, especially when there are dolphins.

Head to the promontory of Nazare for fantastic views and the brave big wave surfers of Portugal.  Photo / 123RF
Head to the promontory of Nazare for fantastic views and the brave big wave surfers of Portugal. Photo / 123RF

Nazare – Cradle of Giant Surfing

An hour north is Nazare, the home of the giant surf. The old square is located at the top of the cliff; visit the charming 14th-century Church of the Sanctuary of Our Lady, then meander to the lighthouse on the promontory for fantastic views.

To the south is Praia de Nazare beach with its colorful beach shelters, terracotta roofs, sun worshipers and sunbathers. To the north is the golden stretch of Praia do Norte beach where huge waves of the Atlantic crash, giving experienced and intrepid surfers the waves of their dreams (October to March). Generated by an underwater canyon, the surf is legendary.

The old fort on the headland houses a beautifully curated surfing museum showcasing surfboards that have survived the big waves and featuring the stories of the daring surfers who have ridden them. Quirky gull sculptures that stand guard on the walls of the fort add a nice creative element.

Take the funicular down to the seaside for lunch and maybe stay a night or two.

Colorful boats on the canal in Aveiro, the “Venice of Portugal” Photo / 123RF
Colorful boats on the canal in Aveiro, the “Venice of Portugal” Photo / 123RF

Aveiro

In this bustling university town, described as “the Venice of Portugal”, merchant boats gently whisk tourists through a network of Venetian-style canals and bridges to the salt marsh lagoon. Once known as “white gold”, salt was mined in Roman times and still is today, although tourists have become the new white gold. Enjoy a G&T at a bar near the market followed by an unpretentious dinner at a local restaurant. Stay in a hotel with a view of the canal.

The neighboring town of Costa Nova is worth a visit. Known for its bold striped chalets and seafood restaurants, settle in for a languorous lunch. Walk from the quiet harbor to the rugged Atlantic beach where the waves crash and, far beyond the horizon, lies America. Locals roasting peppers in front of their house is a common sight.

Porto – A city like no other

Another hour drive north and you will arrive in Porto, a city like no other. Dating back to 300 BC, this fascinating city offers plenty to see and do. Six bridges span the Douro River and the fully integrated transport network ensures that traffic, trains, people and boats move easily from one side to the other. The inhabitants are happy and extremely proud of their city – “the most beautiful in all of Europe”, they say. It’s easy to agree.

The Art Nouveau interior of the iconic Majestic Cafe evokes the splendor of the Belle Époque. The Livraria Lello bookshop attracts tourists with its twisted wooden staircases, stained-glass ceiling and beautiful architectural elements, which are said to have inspired JK Rowling when she imagined Hogwarts School in the Harry Potter series. The shop has a touch of magic, but be prepared for crowds and an entrance fee.

The many port houses are located in Gaia, on the south side of the river. The terrain is steep and your drink will be well deserved. The white port is exceptionally good!

Matosinhos

Continue north to spend time in Matosinhos, which is an unusual mix of traditional old town, modern architecture, and Atlantic resort town with an atmospheric industrial vibe. The beach has silky caramel sand, gentle waves, an esplanade, cafes, apartment buildings and ruins of ancient castles.

An eye-catching sculpture, inspired by fishing nets, looks stunning from any angle. The tiled buildings of the old town seem on the verge of collapse and it is an eerie sight to see the modern metro train going through history.

For lunch, head to Rua Herois de Franca, a street lined with authentic seafood restaurants, where smoke and steam billow from the grills while fresh catches are salted, sizzled, washed down, turned and served. Most of this is done outside on the street and whatever you order – octopus, prawns, sardines or turbot – it’s bound to be incredibly good.

CHECKLIST: LISBON

GETTING THERE
The most direct route from Auckland to Lisbon or Porto is with Emirates via Dubai or Qatar Airways via Doha. Talk to your travel agent about car rental options.
DETAILS
For more things to see and do in Portugal, go to visitportugal.com

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Now is a good time to visit the UK at a “discounted price” https://nomassolo.com/now-is-a-good-time-to-visit-the-uk-at-a-discounted-price/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 13:13:56 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/now-is-a-good-time-to-visit-the-uk-at-a-discounted-price/ The pound has plunged recently, bringing it closer than ever to the dollar. Photo … [+] by Bertrand Langlois AFP via Getty Images The weakened pound makes Britain an attractive prospect for tourists, especially American visitors, providing some optimism for the battered travel industry despite the country’s political and economic turmoil. After two years of […]]]>

The weakened pound makes Britain an attractive prospect for tourists, especially American visitors, providing some optimism for the battered travel industry despite the country’s political and economic turmoil.

After two years of severe recession due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the aftermath of voters’ decision to leave the European Union, at least “a slice of the travel industry sees a ray of hope in the clouds ​storm,” explains The Guardian. “Tour operators welcoming visitors are quietly calling it their best month for bookings since October 2019, as American tourists take advantage of the fall in the pound sterling.”

MORE FORBESTraveling to Europe? Expect more strikes, cancellations and delays this fall and winter

Travel agencies are recommending holiday trips not just to England but also to Scotland and Northern Ireland, not just because of the latest affordability, but also as a way to help Britain at this difficult time. .

The lowest pound for many years

The value of sterling is now at a level not seen in 37 years, touching a record low against the dollar this week just above $1.03 and hovering around $1.12 in this moment.

‘The pound’s fall is so catastrophic that at least one respected US travel publication has urged its readers to book a holiday to Britain not just because it’s a bargain, but to lend a helping hand “, reports inews.

The publication refers to a recently published article by Frommer’s travel guide reporting that “It hasn’t been so cheap for Americans to visit the UK in decades”.

American visitors are particularly sought after as they spend more than most others and, with industry experts predicting a strong dollar at least for next year, spending could approach pre-pandemic 2019 numbers, when tourists spread £4.2billion around the country.

The dark and the optimistic

For the less optimistic experts, the “headlines promising a boom in foreign tourism thanks to the weakness of the pound are premature”, reports inews. “While visitor numbers to Spain and France are almost at pre-pandemic levels, visits to the UK in 2022 are expected to be down 31% from 2019.”

Among the reasons for the gloom is the country’s “tarnished reputation”, a decline that began with Brexit. “Countries go in and out of fashion,” the article notes. “We will always have Shakespeare and Harry Potter, and probably also parliamentary democracy, to bring visitors. But our frequent bellicose approach to close neighbors and relentless bad headlines have damaged the esteem in many countries and deterred millions from visiting us.

Nonetheless, sterling weakness cannot be so easily dismissed as an incentive. “The UK is on sale… Come and see the new king, half price,” Virgin Atlantic chief executive Shai Weiss told The Guardian.

Get more for your dollar

As Frommer notes, “It hasn’t been so cheap for Americans to visit the UK in decades, and if you’re in the financial position to travel this autumn, the climate for more bang for your buck has rarely been better.”

Airlines are also pinning their hopes on the surge in travelers from the United States, especially for the Christmas and New Year holidays.

MORE FORBESAmericans move to Europe: Portugal remains top spot for expats despite restrictions

In addition to the plunging pound, autumn and winter are considered low season offering cheaper accommodation, short or no waits at major attractions including Buckingham Palace and festivities held at most big and small towns to celebrate the holidays, including some of the best Christmases in Europe. markets.

Royal fans had already given London tourism a boost as they poured into the grieving city to experience the pomp and ceremony of Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral processions after an unprecedented seven decades on the throne.

“Visitors flocking to central London from as far away as the US and India for the historic moment are giving businesses a boost at a time when the UK economy is facing a cost crisis of life fueled by the highest inflation in four decades and predictions of an impending recession,” explained AP Europe.

The upcoming coronation of the new King Charles III is also expected to spark renewed interest in the royal family and help boost the travel and tourism industry.

‘Collapse of the pound would benefit American travelers keen to witness the start of Charles III’s reign,’ writes the Evening Standard, adding that the value of sterling will allow American visitors to see the king at a ‘discount’. .

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Europe Travel List: Top 50 Destinations and Experiences https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-list-top-50-destinations-and-experiences/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 11:35:48 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-list-top-50-destinations-and-experiences/ Seeing the Northern Lights tops a list of the top 50 ‘bucket list’ travel dreams for people in the UK]]>

Seeing the Northern Lights tops a list of the top 50 ‘bucket list’ travel dreams for people in the UK



<p>Europe’s to-do list includes viewing the Northern Lights (Paul Zizka/SWNS)</p>
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Europe’s to-do list includes viewing the Northern Lights (Paul Zizka/SWNS)

The list of European trips for people in the UK includes visiting the Northern Lights, the Eiffel Tower and, closer to home, Loch Ness.

Hotpots in Italy took three of the top four spots in a poll of 2,000 adults – Pompeii, Lake Como and the Colosseum in Rome.

Destinations such as Iceland’s Blue Lagoon, Germany’s Black Forest and our very own Stonehenge are also sought after.

Three in 10 adults currently have a list of sights and places they want to visit, which they say will typically take 11 years to complete.

The Acropolis, Athens

The research, commissioned by ALL – Accor Live Limitless – Accor’s lifestyle loyalty program, found that seeing the Northern Lights was the bucket list experience most people seek, and the top destinations people want to visit are Rome, Athens and Barcelona.

Travelers want to do more than just see a place, they want to be part of the destination and dream of experiences like traveling on the Orient Express, sledding with huskies in Lapland, and sailing around the Greek islands.

Venice, Italy

Castles are the number one landmark people are most interested in seeing when they travel, followed by wilderness and bodies of water.

On average, 37% of the typical bucket list is European and 34% admitted there are a lot of places in Europe they haven’t explored yet.

Accor spokesman Luc Gesvret said: “It’s great to see how a UK bucket list is inspired by Europe and the desire to discover amazing destinations and experiences just a few hours away. of the.

“Now travel is back, people want to travel more than ever and dream of experiences they can finally achieve.

“People agree that having a travel wishlist inspires them and gives them something to look forward to and one in five Britons surveyed have already planned and booked trips on a to-do list l ‘next year.

“Whether your trip is food-focused, adventure-driven or you prefer to see historic sites, there is something for everyone to explore and enjoy in Europe. ”

Accor’s Luc Gesvret, which is offering a giveaway where members can earn one million points – worth €20,000, added: “Given the average to-do list will cost over €13,000 £, that’s a lot of trips to make in Europe. ”

The Eiffel Tower, Paris

Top 50 of the European bucket list:

  • 1. Northern Lights – Iceland/Norway
  • 2. Pompeii – Italy
  • 3. Lake Como – Italy
  • 4. Colosseum – Italy
  • 5. Giant’s Causeway – Northern Ireland
  • 6. Acropolis of Athens – Greece
  • 7. Eiffel Tower – France
  • 8. The Blue Lagoon – Iceland
  • 9. Leaning Tower of Pisa – Italy
  • 10. Auschwitz – Poland
  • 11. Vatican City – Italy
  • 12. Loch Ness – Scotland
  • 13. Lake Geneva, Switzerland
  • 14. Trevi Fountain – Italy
  • 15. The Black Forest – Germany
  • 16. Bran Castle (Dracula’s Castle) – Romania
  • 17. Grand Canal – Italy
  • 18. Stonehenge – England
  • 19. The Azores – Portugal
  • 20. Geysir – Iceland The Matterhorn – Switzerland
  • 21. The Roman Baths – Bath, England
  • 22. Anne Frank Museum – Amsterdam
  • 23. Arthur’s Seat Edinburgh – Scotland
  • 24. The Duomo, Florence – Italy
  • 25. Tivoli Gardens – Denmark
  • 26. Brandenburg Gate – Germany
  • 27. Mermaid Statue – Copenhagen
  • 28. Durdle Door – England
  • 29. Buckingham Palace, England
  • 30. Normandy Beaches, France
  • 31. Neuschwanstein Castle – Germany
  • 32. Caucasus Mountains – Georgia
  • 33. Shakespeare’s Stratford – England
  • 34. Landwasser Viaduct Bridge – Switzerland
  • 35. Arc de Triomphe – France
  • 36. Sagrada Familia – Spain
  • 37. Checkpoint Charlie – Berlin
  • 38. Lake Constance – Austria
  • 39. The Hague – Netherlands
  • 40. Montmartre-Paris
  • 41. Island of Lokrum – Croatia
  • 42. Vienna Hofburg – Austria
  • 43. Ancient City of Caceres – Spain
  • 44. Cliffs of Moher – Ireland
  • 45. Duomo di Milano Milan – Italy
  • 46. ​​Parc Guell – Barcelona
  • 47. Vipava Valley – Slovenia
  • 48. Maritime Greenwich – England
  • 49. Szechenyi Baths – Budapest
  • 50. Comporta, Portugal

Top 10 destinations people want to visit:

  • 1.Rome, Italy
  • 2. Florence, Italy
  • 3. Athens, Greece
  • 4. Venice, Italy
  • 5. Barcelona, ​​Spain
  • 6. Vienna, Austria
  • 7. Naples, Italy
  • 8. Madrid, Spain
  • 9. Lisbon, Portugal
  • 10. Amsterdam, Netherlands

Top 10 experiences people want to have:

  • 1. See the Northern Lights
  • 2. Travel on the Orient Express
  • 3. Stay at an ice hotel in Norway
  • 4. Sledding with huskies in Lapland
  • 5. Sail around the Greek Islands
  • 6. Climb the steps of the Giant’s Causeway in Ireland
  • 7. Take a water taxi in Venice
  • 8. Pay homage to Auschwitz
  • 9. Swim in the Blue Lagoon Iceland
  • 10. Visit a vineyard in Italy
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In Cyprus, a prolonged summer — and some surprise visitors https://nomassolo.com/in-cyprus-a-prolonged-summer-and-some-surprise-visitors/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/in-cyprus-a-prolonged-summer-and-some-surprise-visitors/ St. Lazarus Church in Larnaca, Cyprus. Christopher Elliott In the resort town of Larnaca, Cyprus, the European summer travel season continues – and that’s fine for everyone. With temperatures in the 80s and a cooling Mediterranean breeze, visitors from Germany, the UK and Russia are looking to spend their last beach vacation before winter. It […]]]>

In the resort town of Larnaca, Cyprus, the European summer travel season continues – and that’s fine for everyone.

With temperatures in the 80s and a cooling Mediterranean breeze, visitors from Germany, the UK and Russia are looking to spend their last beach vacation before winter.

It is already cold and rainy in Scandinavia and other parts of northern Europe, where autumn is in full swing. Cyprus is one of the last recalcitrant countries in Europe. Unsurprisingly, this extended the tourist season here as well.

“Visitors from northern Europe prefer late summer and early autumn because it’s not as hot here,” says Sophia Charalambous, Market Development Manager for Visit Cyprus. “So October is high season here.”

Where is Cyprus?

Cyprus is an island in the Eastern Mediterranean. It is about 80 miles south of the Turkish coast and west of Syria and Lebanon. A member of the European Union, it is famous for wreck diving, dessert wine and craft traditions like needle lace and basket weaving.

Cyprus’ somewhat central location – between Europe and the Middle East – makes it a favorite destination for Europeans, Israelis and Russians. It’s a curious meeting point, but the road signs tell the story. In Larnaca, near the historic St. Lazarus Church, you can see signs in Greek, English and Russian. The receptionists at the Hotel Opera in the main square switch easily from one language to another, depending on the customer.

As an American in Cyprus, I felt a bit uncomfortable at first about sharing a resort with so many Russians. But as a local explained to me, Eastern Europeans, including Russians, Bulgarians and Poles, come here to escape politics. And, in the end, every Russian I encountered was exceptionally friendly. After all, they were on vacation – or perhaps dodging conscription.

Is it safe to travel to Cyprus?

Cyprus is relatively safe. COVID cases remain low and there are no vaccine requirements for entry. The State Department classifies Cyprus as Category “1”, which means you should take normal precautions. The most important warning from the government is to use an authorized crossing point when entering the Turkish side of the island and not to take photos of border crossings.

But “safe” is a relative term. If you live in Cyprus, you have to remember to avoid drinking tap water (it’s not safe, locals say) and, speaking of bathrooms, never throw away toilet paper. It clogs obsolete pipes. For more information on travel safety, check out my free travel health and safety guide.

Tourism is back in Cyprus — sort of

Tourism in Cyprus has been hit during the pandemic, with visitors falling below 500,000 and then rebounding.

This summer, Cypriot tourism authorities reported that tourism revenue reached $382 million for the first half of the year, up 55% from a year earlier. Authorities hope for full recovery by 2023

Who should visit Cyprus?

Cyprus isn’t exactly on the map for most American visitors. Tourism officials say many Americans who come to Cyprus explore its cultural heritage. There are also special-interest tourists – those with an interest in the island’s culinary scene or artisans. Cyprus also offers a lot for adventurers. The wreckage of Zenobia, a ferry that sank on its maiden voyage in 1980, attracts divers. Yet last year fewer than 20,000 Americans came to Cyprus, making it one of Europe’s lesser-known destinations.

In Nicosia, the atmosphere is more relaxed than in other southern European destinations. Even Athens seems more nervous – a word that is not often used to describe Athens – compared to the Cypriot capital.

In the old town, tourists browse antique shops and clothing stores. In the evening, they sip coffee and sit with their hookah in one of the many cafes under the watchful gaze of the ever-present Saint Helena cats.

Cyprus is an ideal destination for travelers who love history. The Cyprus Museum in downtown Nicosia is just a sample of this story, with exhibits that take you from Neolithic artefacts to the early Bronze Age. At this time of year, there are few visitors and plenty of opportunities to linger and read each exhibit.

There are fewer tourists in Nicosia, the capital, than in Larnaca. Most of the visitors I encountered were from Germany and the UK, and many seemed to be on organized tours. You can easily reach the highlights of Nicosia in a day, including museums and the old town. But this city, even this island, piques your curiosity. It’s a place that doesn’t quite match your perceptions. It’s somewhere between Europe and the Middle East, and yet depending on where you are, it’s also fiercely Greek or Turkish.

For visitors, Cyprus is a mystery just waiting to be explored.

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Impatient tourists, long lines and expensive food: how travel in Europe has changed after the pandemic https://nomassolo.com/impatient-tourists-long-lines-and-expensive-food-how-travel-in-europe-has-changed-after-the-pandemic/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 04:54:17 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/impatient-tourists-long-lines-and-expensive-food-how-travel-in-europe-has-changed-after-the-pandemic/ After two and a half long years of travel bans, tourism is finally back – but with less noise and more fizz. Travelers from all over the world are flocking to popular tourist spots in Europe and beyond in droves. It was no secret that people were eager to get back to travel, however – […]]]>

After two and a half long years of travel bans, tourism is finally back – but with less noise and more fizz.

Travelers from all over the world are flocking to popular tourist spots in Europe and beyond in droves.

It was no secret that people were eager to get back to travel, however – like airlines which can’t seem to handle the pressure – the world wasn’t quite prepared for the influx.

I recently returned home after a month-long jaunt through Europe like hundreds of thousands of other Australians.

LEARN MORE: Airbnb host offering his apartment for $110 a night – but he doesn’t even have furniture

Tourists are flocking to Europe in droves. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

I knew it would be a shock to the system to jump on a long-haul flight for the first time in three years. The biggest shock, however, wasn’t my rediscovery of jet lag.

That was how much these European hotspots changed. Travel etiquette is gone, everything is much more expensive than I remember, and tourists have forgotten how to behave like decent human beings.

I expected a bit of chaos. However, some tourist behavior was quite disconcerting.

Travel was always going to be a little weird after the past two years, but there are some revelations that I really wasn’t prepared for.

Tourists don’t want to wear masks

Of course, the lockdowns are over. But COVID cases aren’t ending the way we hoped, and there’s always a looming threat of re-infection wherever you go.

Despite this, it was incredibly rare to see tourists wearing masks in indoor spaces.

At famous tourist attractions such as the Uffizi in Florence, the Palace of Versailles in France and even Kensington Palace in London, masks were almost impossible to find.

Coughing and sputtering tourists jostled side by side at some of these spots, but people were reluctant to shield themselves from COVID-19.

Passengers crammed into public transport on the Paris Metro and London Underground even gave me weird looks when I put on my mask.

READ MORE: Camilla’s grumpy moment with Prince George and Princess Charlotte

I noticed that travelers rarely wore masks. (Getty)

COVID-19 rules are incredibly inconsistent

Only in Italy did I find myself subject to mandatory mask rules on public transport.

The Trenitalia rail system had officials pacing the carriages, asking people to please put on their masks.

Even the tiny shuttle that runs once an hour in the Amalfi coastal town of Positano asked locals and tourists to wear masks or they wouldn’t be allowed on board.

I found it surprising that a few hours away, in France, there is no mask mandate anywhere.

The inconsistency across the continent was confusing – but remembering how hard Italy was hit at the start of COVID-19, their strict rules made sense.

READ MORE: An ’embarrassing’ mistake saw Princess Mary excluded from the Queen’s funeral

Traveler impatience is at an all-time high

During the almost three years that we have been banned from flying around the world, it seems that travelers have forgotten how to be calm and reasonable people.

At almost every major attraction in Europe, I fell victim to rude, pushy, belligerent tourists who just couldn’t wait another moment to get their hands on a bus/train/boat/museum ticket.

Particularly in Italy, there were maddening free riders at every turn. Queuing with respect seems to be a thing of the past!

In each city, I dragged my huge suitcase to the hotel from the train or bus to avoid exorbitant taxi fares.

Travel in Europe
Everywhere in Europe had endless lines, (provided)

READ MORE: Adam Levine denies cheating on his pregnant wife

I noticed people had no interest in getting out of the way or staying on their side of the trail. Often, pedestrians stood in the middle of the sidewalk on their phones, completely oblivious to the world around them.

There was an “every man for himself” vibe during my time abroad, and it was quite sad.

The lines are everywhere

Of course, hitting Europe during the peak of summer travel will mean lines – and lots of them.

But this year, there seemed to be a line for almost anything you could dream of doing on your vacation.

Think ice cream parlors, toilets, trains, museums, restaurants and clothing stores. I even saw a queue of 30 people to enter a Swatch store in Paris.

“The etiquette is gone, everything is much more expensive and tourists have forgotten how to behave like decent human beings”

At the Tower of London – days before the Queen died – there was a two-hour queue to see the Crown Jewels.

And the queue to just pick up your prepaid tickets at the Uffizi in Florence was incredibly long. There was simply no way to avoid them.

There are unprecedented numbers of people returning to the beautiful continent of Europe this year, so expect queues.

Travel in Europe
No one at Versailles in Paris (pictured) had a mask either. (Provided)

Prices are through the roof

Europe will always be expensive for an Australian tourist, thanks to our disappointing exchange rate.

But in 2022, everything seemed to be at least 30% more expensive than before the pandemic.

It’s just not a budget travel location if you want to enjoy local food and wine and visit all the major attractions.

In France and Malta, it was hard to find a good dinner for less than €20 ($30) a plate. Taxis in every town were basically out of the question due to skyrocketing costs (think €60 ($90) just for a few blocks).

In Positano, Italy, we were shocked to find that a restaurant enforced a two-plate minimum rule when we tried to order pizza.

We were forced to order a meager €18 ($27) Caprese salad that probably cost less than 50 cents to put together.

And if you forgot sunscreen on your way to the beach, you can buy one at a convenience store. Oh, but it will be €25 ($37).

I understand that hospitality venues and tourist attractions are trying to recoup lost revenue due to closures and travel bans. But I was not ready to spend my money so quickly.

Positano, Italy
Positano in Italy is picturesque but very expensive. (Provided)

READ MORE: Meghan Markle’s audacious request for King Charles III

Locals aren’t used to swarming with tourists

The reintroduction of tourism has been a bittersweet experience for locals.

I imagine they’ve relished the empty streets and lack of teeming tourists for the past two summers. But they also need tourism to keep their economy alive.

This amounts to a bizarre but understandable attitude towards travelers.

Locals love to scoff when they see another pair of starry-eyed travelers fresh off a plane dragging their suitcases down the cobbled streets.

But they want to invites you to patronize their restaurants, cafes and bars which have exorbitant rents and are in desperate need of the tourist dollar to breathe new life into their town.

There is a feeling of “we need you here but we’re not too happy about it” from many residents across France, Italy and Malta.

Maybe when the tourism boom starts to return to normal rates, they won’t feel so resentful of it all.

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The best countries to visit if you hate tourists

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Europe Travel Vaccines Market Analysis / Forecast Report 2021-2022 and 2028 with Abbott, Dynavax Technologies, Emergent BioSolutions, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Sanofi and Valneva – ResearchAndMarkets.com https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-vaccines-market-analysis-forecast-report-2021-2022-and-2028-with-abbott-dynavax-technologies-emergent-biosolutions-glaxosmithkline-merck-novartis-pfizer-sanofi-and-valneva-res/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 09:06:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-vaccines-market-analysis-forecast-report-2021-2022-and-2028-with-abbott-dynavax-technologies-emergent-biosolutions-glaxosmithkline-merck-novartis-pfizer-sanofi-and-valneva-res/ DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The report “Europe Travel Vaccines Market Forecast to 2028 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis By Product and Application” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. Europe Travel Vaccines Market is expected to grow from US$995.47 Million in 2021 to US$1,885.56 Million by 2028; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 9.6% […]]]>

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The report “Europe Travel Vaccines Market Forecast to 2028 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis By Product and Application” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

Europe Travel Vaccines Market is expected to grow from US$995.47 Million in 2021 to US$1,885.56 Million by 2028; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 9.6% from 2021 to 2028.

Hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, human papilloma virus (HPV), meningococcal disease, typhoid and yellow fever are among the various chronic diseases detected in the region.

Similarly, in 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the Global Immunization Strategic Framework 2021-2030. The framework provides a vaccination plan for vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs), such as hepatitis A and B. Additionally, there are different vaccination routines for travelers suggested by WHO to prevent the spread of diseases deadly infections.

The vaccine routine includes routine vaccines to review before travelling, vaccines for certain destinations and vaccines required by certain countries. In most cases, booster doses of routine vaccines are needed if people have not followed the regular schedule. Such initiatives by WHO and CDC are enhancing the demand for vaccines, thereby driving the growth of its market.

On the other hand, the COVID-19 epidemic has threatened public health. Various emergency actions have been launched during the pandemic, of which the COVAX initiative has been aggressively embraced. Vaccination against COVID-19 was mandatory for people around the world. Governments in each region have made vaccinations mandatory for people traveling within and outside the countries. The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed significantly to travel vaccines.

With new features and technologies, vendors can attract new customers and expand their footprint in emerging markets. This factor is likely to drive the travel vaccine market in Europe.

Europe Travel Vaccines Market Segmentation

  • In 2021, the others segment held the largest market share.

  • In 2021, the outbound travel segment held the largest market share.

Key Market Dynamics

Market factors

  • Significant increase in travel and tourism

  • Growing incidence of infectious diseases

Market constraints

  • High cost of travel vaccines

Market opportunities

  • Vaccine Awareness

Future trends

  • Significant demand for vaccines

Company Profiles

  • Abbott

  • Dynavax Technologies

  • Emergent BioSolutions Inc.

  • GlaxoSmithKline plc

  • Merck & Co., Inc.

  • Novartis AG

  • Pfizer Inc.

  • Sanofi

  • Valneva SE

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/us8ml3

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Sights to see and insider tips for the best European vacation https://nomassolo.com/sights-to-see-and-insider-tips-for-the-best-european-vacation/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 12:00:44 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/sights-to-see-and-insider-tips-for-the-best-european-vacation/ Ban Jelačić Square in Zagreb in the fall of 2022. Christopher Elliott On a Sunday afternoon in September, Ban Jelačić Square in Zagreb is practically empty. A statue of Josip Jelačić on horseback stands in the town square. It’s one of Croatia’s most iconic sights, and just a few weeks ago you couldn’t take a […]]]>

On a Sunday afternoon in September, Ban Jelačić Square in Zagreb is practically empty. A statue of Josip Jelačić on horseback stands in the town square. It’s one of Croatia’s most iconic sights, and just a few weeks ago you couldn’t take a picture of it without battling throngs of tourists.

But with the end of the summer travel season, things are much calmer.

“We had a busy summer,” says tour guide Ivana Mudronja. “Not as busy as 2019, but much better than last year.”

And this fall?

“We’ll see,” she adds.

This is the third part of a series on autumn travel in Europe. Here is the first part with the outlook for autumn travel. And here is the second part on where to go and what to do.

This is good news for American visitors, many of whom have Croatia on their to-do list. Fewer visitors mean lower prices and more opportunities for an authentic experience when traveling through Europe. There are still Europe travel packages available to places you couldn’t see this summer – and yes, there’s still time for the perfect European vacation in 2022.

As far as destinations go, Europe is all the rage this fall. A report published yesterday by Bounce revealed that 8 of the top 10 fall destinations were in Europe. Amsterdam, Paris, London and Berlin top the list.

Can Americans travel to Europe now?

Yes. Most European countries have restrictions on books requiring proof of vaccination, recovery from COVID-19 or a negative test result when entering countries or areas with “high epidemiological risk”. However, no country was on this list as of September 17, 2022.

If you are planning a trip to Europe, there is one thing to know: next year the European Union will introduce the European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS). It is an electronic system that tracks visitors who do not require a visa and works similarly to the US Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA). The ETIAS application fee is $7 and you can pay by credit card. Here is my free guide to planning a trip.

It’s still too early to tell how fall travel in Europe will go

At the Esplanade Zagreb Hotel, business is almost back to normal. The hotel, opened in 1925 as a stopover on the Orient Express, is one of the most luxurious in the city. Still, room rates this time of year are just $136 a night, meaning the centrally located property is also affordable for many American visitors.

Ivica Max Krizmanić, the general manager, says that the occupancy rate could reach the record levels they reached in 2019 for this year. But it is still too early to tell.

“It’s been a good summer here and the fall is looking good, but you can’t see too far into the future because booking habits have changed,” he told me.

Still, Krizmanić thinks the window for bargain hunters is small. Summer travelers stay later, pushing into the fall. And there’s no room at the hostel when Zagreb’s famous Christmas market starts on November 26. Krizmanić says he can’t be sure of availability but recommends booking as soon as possible.

Experts say that uncertainty and the likelihood of a shorter window for bargain hunters is widespread in Europe this fall. And this could be the grand finale of COVID pricing. In fact, one of the biggest trends I’ve been tracking for 2023 is a return to normal booking habits. That means the last-minute deals we’ve seen during the pandemic could all but disappear.

The sites to see in Europe this fall

I asked Claire Saylor, head of marketing at luxury agency Audley Travel, where to go this fall.

“Europe has long been one of Audley’s main destinations,” she told me. “And it continues after the pandemic.”

Among their first places this fall: Italy, Spain and Portugal.

“Our customers particularly enjoy cultural visits, meeting the locals and really understanding the character of a country,” she added. “The strong dollar is helping to offset some of the inflation-related price rises seen in the destination, making it an excellent choice for travel this year.”

Here are some of the Europe travel packages his company currently offers.

September in Spain

Spain in September is pleasantly warm and generally dry. Visitor numbers are lower than during the peak summer months and temperatures are more comfortable for hiking and sightseeing, says Saylor.

His company is offering organized trips to Madrid, San Sebastian and La Rioja this fall. Among the most sought-after visited attractions in Spain are its museums, including the Prado in Madrid and the Guggenheim in Bilbao. Spain’s historic capital, Toledo, and wine tastings in the Ribera del Duero and Rioja wine regions also top the list of his clients.

October in the UK

Saylor says nothing compares to a visit to England and Scotland in October. You’ll see vibrant fall foliage in city parks and in the countryside. Plus, temperatures remain moderate, so you can explore the cities without the summer crowds.

A typical autumn itinerary includes stops in London, Edinburgh, Bath and the Cairngorms. She says travelers enjoy exploring the mountains and lochs of Cairngorms National Park and having tea at the Roman Baths.

November in Italy

Thanks to its mild Mediterranean climate, Italy is the top destination choice in November, says Saylor. In southern cities like Naples and Palermo, daytime highs are often in the 60s, allowing visitors to spend time outdoors. There are almost no crowds.

Americans like to visit places like Florence, Rome and Naples in the fall. One of his best tours includes a Tuscan cooking lesson with a local chef in Florence, a visit to the Archaeological Museum of Naples to see original artefacts from Pompeii, and a tour of the Vatican Museums. The Sistine Chapel is much less crowded at this time of year.

Is there still time to plan a trip to Europe this fall?

Travel agents like Saylor say there’s still availability for his fall tours. But they fill up fast. I spoke with tourism insiders – hoteliers, tour guides and restaurateurs – and they all agreed: Right now demand is high for trips to Europe, but even experts aren’t sure if that will last. .

Back in Zagreb, it is still hot at this time of year. Finding a table at a popular restaurant is easy. There is no line for the Zagreb Funicular on Tomić Street, one of the shortest public transport funiculars in the world. If you wanted to plan a last minute trip to Croatia, that would be easy. A flight next week from Washington, DC, to Zagreb would cost you around $1,100.

But October and November are a bit murkier. The energy crisis in Europe could intensify, disrupting travel but lowering prices due to the favorable exchange rate. The war in Ukraine could escalate, scaring away some visitors. But it is also possible that other hotels will follow the Esplanade – a strong summer, followed by an equally strong fall.

And if that happens, you can’t book your European vacation soon enough.

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Where to go and what to do https://nomassolo.com/where-to-go-and-what-to-do/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 08:53:41 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/where-to-go-and-what-to-do/ A view of Dubrovnik, Croatia from Mount Srđ. Dubrovnik is one of the most popular fall destinations … [+] in Europe. Christopher Elliott There may not be a trendier European travel destination this fall than Dubrovnik, Croatia. Its narrow, cobbled streets and almost perfectly preserved Gothic, Renaissance and late Romanesque buildings continue to attract visitors […]]]>

There may not be a trendier European travel destination this fall than Dubrovnik, Croatia. Its narrow, cobbled streets and almost perfectly preserved Gothic, Renaissance and late Romanesque buildings continue to attract visitors long after the summer season has ended.

Crowds of visitors stroll along the historic Old Town esplanade in the unforgiving late summer sun, dipping into ice cream shops and pizzerias to escape the searing heat. The bravest of them climb the city walls, which offer breathtaking views of a turquoise Adriatic.

This year, it looks like summer may never end. At least that’s the opinion of Maris Picunic of Villa Orabelle, a boutique hotel just outside the city walls.

“We’re getting closer to where we were in 2019 in terms of visitors,” she says. Since Dubrovnik is so far south, the season is longer, so there’s still time to match – and maybe even exceed – 2019 visitor levels.

This is part two of a series on fall travel in Europe. Here is the first part with the outlook for autumn travel.

Graham Carter, founder of luxury travel operator Unforgettable Croatia, agrees. He says he has never seen anything like it.

“We expect the coming season to be much busier than previous fall seasons in Europe, with businesses perhaps still struggling to keep up with continued demand,” he told me. .

This is good news for the Croatian tourism industry. But for visitors looking for a bargain, maybe not. Picunic says prices have “come down a bit” since the end of the traditional summer travel season, but Dubrovnik remains one of Croatia’s most expensive places to vacation. Yet, with the euro at par, it is more affordable than it has been for years.

A new poll from Medjet suggests that Europe is a popular destination this fall and winter. In its survey, 91% of respondents said they intend to travel by the end of this year and 62% plan to travel abroad. The first region is Europe.

But where is everyone going – and where should you go? Once there, what to do? More importantly, how do you find the best deals in Europe?

Where is everyone going in Europe this fall?

So where is everyone going this fall? It depends who you ask.

Demand from American travelers for European vacation homes has more than doubled compared to the same period last year, according to Vrbo. This fall, Paris tops the list of the most popular European destinations. It is followed by Rome, London, Florence, Lisbon and Barcelona.

World Nomads Group reviewed the destinations of its policyholders and found that Italy, Greece, Croatia and Austria topped the list of European fall destinations.

“Travellers are less interested in visiting Spain and Germany,” says Christina Tunnah, managing director of global marketing at World Nomads Group. “There has also been a slight drop in interest in France as a destination.”

Fall bookings to Europe are up 16% from a year ago, according to Travelport. For the United Kingdom, they increased by 70%. In fact, many European destinations were busier than they were in 2019. For the recent Labor Day holiday, Travelport found that visits to Italy were up 8%, Greece by 23%, in Portugal 25% and in Turkey 44%.

It’s hard to gauge where people are going now because fall trips don’t usually get much attention from stat-gatherers. After all, it’s shoulder season — and it’s supposed to be quiet. But not this year.

Pro tip: I interviewed dozens of travel experts on where to go and what to do in Europe this fall. There is a consensus that choosing a less popular destination will give you the most bang for your buck. So if the prices in Dubrovnik are too high, go to Split. If Paris is too much, check out Nice. (It’s sunny this time of year.)

What to do in Europe this fall

Europe is a draw for all sorts of reasons, experts say. Kim Parizek, a travel consultant specializing in Europe, says her clients return to the countries they’ve visited, but not for the same old experiences.

“I spend a lot more time working with destination providers to research new experiences that are off the beaten path,” she says. “Guests are returning to France or Italy for the fifth and sixth time, but now want to explore unique new excursions, places to stay and restaurants.”

The hope is that they can do so without the massive summer crowds that have made many European destinations almost unbearable.

“Off the beaten path” seems to be a theme. I spoke with several tour operators who said their customers were looking for solitude – and maybe somewhere where winter doesn’t start too soon.

Turkey and southern Spain are particularly attractive. “The weather can still be pleasant in November, while the crowds tend to die out,” says Kelly Torrens, vice president of product for Kensington Tours. But, she adds, “it’s important to have patience when you go on a trip.” That’s always good advice.

What are the pros doing? Limor Decter, travel consultant at Embark Collective, will be heading to Sicily in October to enjoy the cultural and natural attractions. She says hoteliers she spoke to are hoping for a quieter fall. “They look forward to sharing their hospitality with travelers who have patiently waited and avoided the summer of frantic travel to enjoy a fall visit,” she says.

Pro tip: Many Americans wrote off COVID in Europe this fall. But that’s a mistake, says Kate Fitzpatrick, regional director of security at World Travel Protection. She notes that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still lists the UK and much of Europe as a “moderate” COVID threat. The CDC advises that you get up to date on your vaccines before traveling to a Tier 3 destination. “That means you’ve received not just the full initial vaccinations, but any boosters for which you’re eligible,” she says. . Here is my free guide to planning a trip.

How to get the offers in Europe

According to experts, the earlier you book your fall trip to Europe, the better.

“My best advice would be to plan and book your trip well in advance to get the best deals for every stop on your preferred route,” says Rajeev Shrivastava, CEO of VisitorsCoverage.com, a travel insurance marketplace .

Prices tend to drop for the fall travel season, but airlines have already started pricing their tickets for the holidays.

The prices are all over the map and you have to search carefully for the best deals. For example, I recently rented a car in Split, Croatia for a week. On most US travel sites, I couldn’t find anything under $600, which isn’t an outrageous price. But I found an upgraded car for just $160 when I rented from an off-airport location.

Pro tip: If you’re looking for a cheaper plane ticket, aim for the week of October 10, says Expedia. “Average ticket prices are expected to be 20% lower than summer for international flights,” said Christie Hudson, spokesperson for Expedia.

Ready to visit Europe? Maybe it’s time to go

Despite higher prices and crowds, fall 2022 might be one of the best times to visit Europe. The euro is at par with the dollar, which means that prices are lower. Crowds have dwindled from the frenetic summer travel season. And the weather is getting colder. Even the locals I spoke to in Dubrovnik say the autumn weather is here. (“You wouldn’t have wanted to be here in June,” Picunic said. “It was way too hot.”)

Remember that prices will start to rise again as the holiday season approaches. And unless you’re lucky enough to be in a place like Portugal’s famed Alentejo region or Cyprus, you’ll need to bundle up.

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European travel agents and tour operators will meet in Chania, Crete https://nomassolo.com/european-travel-agents-and-tour-operators-will-meet-in-chania-crete/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/european-travel-agents-and-tour-operators-will-meet-in-chania-crete/ Board members of ECTAA, the umbrella organization of European travel agents and tour operators, will hold a meeting in Chania, Crete, from September 15-17. According to an announcement, the meeting will focus on topics concerning European tourism, as well as management and decision-making on current travel issues. This will be ECTAA’s first meeting in Greece […]]]>

Board members of ECTAA, the umbrella organization of European travel agents and tour operators, will hold a meeting in Chania, Crete, from September 15-17.

According to an announcement, the meeting will focus on topics concerning European tourism, as well as management and decision-making on current travel issues.

This will be ECTAA’s first meeting in Greece for 2022, since the organization announced the country as its “preferred destination for 2022” following an agreement with the Greek National Tourism Organization (GNTO) in April. As part of this agreement, ECTAA promotes Greece as its preferred travel destination for one year among its 70,000 member travel agents and tour operators in Europe.

While in Chania, ECTAA delegates will have the chance to experience Greece first-hand beyond its summer season and also explore the possibility of hosting future congresses in Greece.

According to the Hellenic Association of Travel and Tourism Agencies (HATTA), a member of ECTAA, the organisation’s visit is very encouraging and optimistic, because in the midst of a special tourist season, Greece is delighted with the further development of tourism for 2023 .

“Travel agencies from Europe will come together for multi-level cooperation to increase tourist flows in European countries and Greece expects to benefit greatly,” HATTA said.


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