Europe guide – Nomas Solo http://nomassolo.com/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 10:51:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nomassolo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Europe guide – Nomas Solo http://nomassolo.com/ 32 32 Strong dollar helped fuel US travelers’ interest in Europe: Travel Weekly https://nomassolo.com/strong-dollar-helped-fuel-us-travelers-interest-in-europe-travel-weekly/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 11:09:25 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/strong-dollar-helped-fuel-us-travelers-interest-in-europe-travel-weekly/ American travelers are shopping in Europe this year, with the dollar hitting its highest value against the euro in two decades amid increased travel to the continent. Industry analysts say the strong dollar has helped fuel already huge demand for Europe this summer, while travel advisers have used it as a sales tool, telling customers […]]]>

American travelers are shopping in Europe this year, with the dollar hitting its highest value against the euro in two decades amid increased travel to the continent.

Industry analysts say the strong dollar has helped fuel already huge demand for Europe this summer, while travel advisers have used it as a sales tool, telling customers it’s now the best time to take that delayed vacation, with Europe, essentially, on sale.

You actually get a discount when your credit card bill is lower than you expected six months or a year ago.– Owner of the travel agency Nicole LeBlanc

“Guests have been especially excited to return to European travel this year after the long hiatus due to Covid restrictions,” said Laurel Brunvoll, owner of My Unforgettable Trips of Gaithersburg, Md. “The strong dollar this year has certainly helped fuel travel demand Europe is much more attractive when the euro is more on par with the dollar.

“And shopping is a major component of many customers’ vacations.”

The strong demand for trips to Europe began before the arrival of the lowest exchange rate between the dollar and the euro since 2002. These bookings increased further as the dollar strengthened and, conversely, depressed traveling the other way.

Felix Genatio, senior business data analyst at Dohop, a travel search engine, said flight sales from the US to Europe from January to April this year were “roughly similar to demand for flights from Europe to the United States, but from May to July – which is when the dollar really starts to rally against the euro – we saw sales from the United States to the ‘Europe increased by 113%, while bookings from Europe to the United States only increased by 43%.’

In July, according to Dohop data, 4.5 million tickets were sold for flights to Europe from the United States, compared to just under 3 million for travel between Europe and the United States. . “It’s an unprecedented gap,” Genatio said.

Spend more at destination

Travel advisers say American travelers don’t seem to be crossing the pond because of the strong dollar, but it’s leading to a surge of splurges once there, which spending data has confirmed.

“As international travel has rebounded over the last year or so, we have seen the total amount of money spent by Americans vacationing in major European destinations increase exponentially,” said Carlos Cendra, director of sales and marketing at travel information provider Mabrian. “For example, for the year to the end of July, spending in Barcelona and Paris is up 659% and 529%, respectively, compared to the previous period, August 2020 to 2021.”

Toni Lanotte-Day, owner of Toni Tours in Levittown, NY, said customers she boarded an Emerald Azzurra sailing the Mediterranean decided to stay abroad longer to shop more and enjoy the best hotel rates due to the strong dollar.

Aga Jones, owner of Aga Travel in Washington, said many of his honeymoon clients who booked spring trips for summer departures were able to take advantage of lower hotel rates once in Europe.

“For activities and car rentals that were paid for later, the exchange rate was definitely in their favor,” Jones said. “Couples who booked relatively last minute certainly got better deals on hotel stays.”

Nicole LeBlanc, owner of Mon Voyage in Dallas, said that even for trips booked a while ago, when payment is required in local currency at the time of travel, “you actually get a discount when your credit card bill is lower than you expected six months or a year ago.”

Analysts said tour operators and other travel companies are also looking for bargains. “Typically, on a business level, we see US-based, dollar-denominated tour operators and other B2B buyers of travel booking more European hotels because they can offer more competitive prices than most others. country,” said Wolfgang Emperger, senior vice president of the Shiji Group.

Christmas Cruises, Christmas Shopping

The strong dollar is giving travel advisers another way to offer vacation travel, with this year’s vacation travel season set to be the first big, uninterrupted one since the pandemic began.

During an October 3 Folo by Travel Weekly podcast episode about this year’s Christmas Market River Cruises in Europe, Jennifer Tombaugh, President of Tauck, and Lisa Fitzgerald, Owner of Fitzgerald Travel in Spofford, NH, agreed that the strong dollar had an impact on travellers.

“We’re seeing dollar-based interest as a whole, which I think also helps offset some of the inflationary pressures that you’re seeing as well,” Tombaugh said. “So while things here may seem more expensive, they’re cheaper overseas.”

Travel advisors have friendly advice for customers expressing such interest: “Make sure you pack an empty suitcase with bubble wrap and tape, because you’re going to find a lot of stuff you’ll want to take home.” , said Fitzgerald. .

Tombaugh, a Christmas market customer herself, agreed wholeheartedly and said the worst of the lost luggage issues seemed to be over. Still, she encourages travelers to use tracking devices like AirTags in their luggage for the season.

“Pack an extra bag, shop and enjoy the dollar, and throw in an AirTag,” Tombaugh said.

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In Cyprus, an extended summer — and some surprise visitors https://nomassolo.com/in-cyprus-an-extended-summer-and-some-surprise-visitors/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 10:01:10 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/in-cyprus-an-extended-summer-and-some-surprise-visitors/ St. Lazarus Church in Larnaca, Cyprus. Christopher Elliott In the resort town of Larnaca, Cyprus, the European summer travel season continues – and that’s fine for everyone. With temperatures in the 80s and a cooling Mediterranean breeze, visitors from Germany, the UK and Russia are looking to spend their last beach vacation before winter. It […]]]>

In the resort town of Larnaca, Cyprus, the European summer travel season continues – and that’s fine for everyone.

With temperatures in the 80s and a cooling Mediterranean breeze, visitors from Germany, the UK and Russia are looking to spend their last beach vacation before winter.

It is already cold and rainy in Scandinavia and other parts of northern Europe, where autumn is in full swing. Cyprus is one of the last recalcitrant countries in Europe. Unsurprisingly, this extended the tourist season here as well.

“Visitors from northern Europe prefer late summer and early autumn because it’s not as hot here,” says Sophia Charalambous, Market Development Manager for Visit Cyprus. “So October is high season here.”

Where is Cyprus?

Cyprus is an island in the Eastern Mediterranean. It is about 80 miles south of the Turkish coast and west of Syria and Lebanon. A member of the European Union, it is famous for wreck diving, dessert wine and craft traditions like needle lace and basket weaving.

Cyprus’ somewhat central location – between Europe and the Middle East – makes it a favorite destination for Europeans, Israelis and Russians. It’s a curious meeting point, but the road signs tell the story. In Larnaca, near the historic St. Lazarus Church, you can see signs in Greek, English and Russian. The receptionists at the Hotel Opera in the main square switch easily from one language to another, depending on the customer.

As an American in Cyprus, I felt a bit uncomfortable at first about sharing a resort with so many Russians. But as a local explained to me, Eastern Europeans, including Russians, Bulgarians and Poles, come here to escape politics. And, in the end, every Russian I encountered was exceptionally friendly. After all, they were on vacation – or perhaps dodging conscription.

Is it safe to travel to Cyprus?

Cyprus is relatively safe. COVID cases remain low and there are no vaccine requirements for entry. The State Department classifies Cyprus as Category “1”, which means you should take normal precautions. The most important warning from the government is to use an authorized crossing point when entering the Turkish side of the island and not to take photos of border crossings.

But “safe” is a relative term. If you live in Cyprus, you have to remember to avoid drinking tap water (it’s not safe, locals say) and, speaking of bathrooms, never throw away toilet paper. It clogs obsolete pipes. For more information on travel safety, check out my free travel health and safety guide.

Tourism is back in Cyprus — sort of

Tourism in Cyprus has been hit during the pandemic, with visitors falling below 500,000 and then rebounding.

This summer, Cypriot tourism authorities reported that tourism revenue reached $382 million for the first half of the year, up 55% from a year earlier. Authorities hope for full recovery by 2023

Who should visit Cyprus?

Cyprus isn’t exactly on the map for most American visitors. Tourism officials say many Americans who come to Cyprus explore its cultural heritage. There are also special-interest tourists – those with an interest in the island’s culinary scene or artisans. Cyprus also offers a lot for adventurers. The wreckage of Zenobia, a ferry that sank on its maiden voyage in 1980, attracts divers. Yet last year fewer than 20,000 Americans came to Cyprus, making it one of Europe’s lesser-known destinations.

In Nicosia, the atmosphere is more relaxed than in other southern European destinations. Even Athens seems more nervous – a word that is not often used to describe Athens – compared to the Cypriot capital.

In the old town, tourists browse antique shops and clothing stores. In the evening, they sip coffee and sit with their hookah in one of the many cafes under the watchful gaze of the ever-present St. Helena cats.

Cyprus is an ideal destination for travelers who love history. The Cyprus Museum in downtown Nicosia is just a sample of this story, with exhibits that take you from Neolithic artefacts to the early Bronze Age. At this time of year, there are few visitors and plenty of opportunities to linger and read each exhibit.

There are fewer tourists in Nicosia, the capital, than in Larnaca. Most of the visitors I encountered were from Germany and the UK, and many seemed to be on organized tours. You can easily reach the highlights of Nicosia in a day, including museums and the old town. But this city, even this island, piques your curiosity. It’s a place that doesn’t quite match your perceptions. It’s somewhere between Europe and the Middle East, and yet depending on where you are, it’s also fiercely Greek or Turkish.

For visitors, Cyprus is a mystery just waiting to be explored.

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Travel to Europe: Five must-see Paris tours to keep on your radar https://nomassolo.com/travel-to-europe-five-must-see-paris-tours-to-keep-on-your-radar/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 00:47:47 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/travel-to-europe-five-must-see-paris-tours-to-keep-on-your-radar/ Whether it’s a sunset cruise in a classic car or a visit to the city’s most unusual sites, there are plenty of tours to help you explore Paris. Photo / 123rf Saving for a dream trip to the City of Lights? Add these unique tours to your wish list, writes Tiana Templeman. See all the […]]]>

Whether it’s a sunset cruise in a classic car or a visit to the city’s most unusual sites, there are plenty of tours to help you explore Paris. Photo / 123rf

Saving for a dream trip to the City of Lights? Add these unique tours to your wish list, writes Tiana Templeman.

See all the main highlights – in just one day!

If you are in Paris for quite a while, not long, it may be impossible to decide what to do. Should you visit the Eiffel Tower or the Louvre, the Basilique du Sacré-Coeur or Notre-Dame, take a cruise on the Seine, explore a classic neighborhood or simply stroll around the city?

The good news is, there’s no need to choose, because a one-day Paris tour lets you see all of these things and more in — you guessed it — just one day. While visiting all of these iconic attractions in just nine hours might seem impossible (not to mention exhausting), it’s easy enough when you’re with a local who knows all the shortcuts. The tour runs in an order that minimizes crowds and includes metro transport, skip-the-line access, and an expert local guide who shares fun facts and interesting stories along the way.
Cost: $269 for adults; $253 for children. takewalks.com

Tour of Paris in a Citroën 2CV

It’s a heavenly marriage: a cheerful Citroën 2CV and the city of Paris. As a touring vehicle, this classic French car adds a certain je ne sais quoi and its compact size makes it easy to navigate the narrow lanes of the arrondissements of Paris, especially with a handsome Frenchman behind the wheel. Tours are available from 11am to 10pm, but the best time to book this 1-hour tour around the French capital is just before sunset.

Cruising the streets in a classic Citroën 2CV is a fun way to see Paris, especially with a local behind the wheel.  Photo / Tiana Templeman
Cruising the streets in a classic Citroën 2CV is a fun way to see Paris, especially with a local behind the wheel. Photo / Tiana Templeman

As the waning light bathes the historic buildings of Paris in a soft glow, your classic transport zips through the famous streets and around the Arc de Triomphe with its radiant avenues and thrills. As the sun dips below the horizon, you’ll make your way to the Eiffel Tower, stopping just as the lights come on and dancing up and down the city’s famous landmark. You will have time to take photos with your shiny 2CV before being returned to your hotel.
Cost: From $130 per car for a one hour visit. 2cvparistour.com

See history come to life at the Museum of Fairground Arts

The Musée des Arts Forains, or Musée des Arts Forains, proves that you’re never too old to ride a carousel. However, you may be too young. In the late 1800s, when bicycles were more expensive than horses, adults lined up to ride bikes on carousels powered by their feet and reaching speeds of up to 60 km/h. You will find one of these carousels in this museum, which has one of the largest collections of old rides and games in the world. Better yet, you can ride it, but only if you’re 13 or older.

You can also see (and hear) a rare Hooghuys fairground organ, ride other historic carousels, play quirky amusement games, and learn about life in Europe in the 1800s on a two-hour interactive tour . English tours are available during the summer months, with an English transcript provided at other times of the year.
Cost: $30.60 for adults; $20.85 for children. arts-forains.com

Spend a strange evening in Paris

Discover a darker side of Paris on a spooky ghost tour that ventures through historic buildings and winding alleys to show you a side of the city that isn’t in tourist brochures. Your macabre guide is an expert on the grim and seedy side of Paris, when people were burned at the stake and sentenced to death at the Palais de Justice. It didn’t matter if you were king or poor, no one was safe from the dazzling blade of the guillotine.

Explore the spooky side of town on an evening ghost tour.  Photo / 123rf
Explore the spooky side of town on an evening ghost tour. Photo / 123rf

Walk in the footsteps of the plague that ravaged the city in the mid-1300s, hear tragic love stories and scare yourself with horrifying tales of ghosts, blood, murder and mayhem. You’ll be looking over your shoulder on the way back to your hotel after this hair-raising evening.
Cost: €34.20. citywonders.com

Explore a neighborhood with a local – for free

Whoever said “we got nothing for nothing” obviously never came to Paris. The city is part of the Global Greeter Network, an international organization that organizes free guided tours led by passionate volunteer guides in cities around the world.

Paris is full of stories behind the facade, and there are a range of tours to help bring them to life.  Photo/123rf.
Paris is full of stories behind the facade, and there are a range of tours to help bring them to life. Photo/123rf.

In Paris, our guide was a retired professor who showed us around Montmartre, where he had lived for over 30 years. Pierre not only had the perfect name, he also had a portfolio of fascinating historical photos and the communication skills of someone who has spent his life teaching. To my surprise, he also shared my passion for the incredibly romantic film Amélie and shared behind-the-scenes stories about Montmartre filming locations that only a local would know. Greeter tours aren’t just about visiting the sights, they also offer a fascinating insight into the heart and soul of a destination and the people who make it great.
Cost: Free. Reservations essential. greeters.paris

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Uniworld cruises and train trips offer deeper dive into Europe: Travel Weekly https://nomassolo.com/uniworld-cruises-and-train-trips-offer-deeper-dive-into-europe-travel-weekly/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 14:44:43 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/uniworld-cruises-and-train-trips-offer-deeper-dive-into-europe-travel-weekly/ Cruise and train combinations are growing in popularity with river cruise companies as some begin to expand their itineraries to include the classic way of travelling. Uniworld is one of the latest river cruise lines to introduce a new cruise and train program to its suite of cruise offerings, but with an additional caveat: instead […]]]>

Cruise and train combinations are growing in popularity with river cruise companies as some begin to expand their itineraries to include the classic way of travelling.

Uniworld is one of the latest river cruise lines to introduce a new cruise and train program to its suite of cruise offerings, but with an additional caveat: instead of offering train travel as a simple extension before or after the river cruise, the company includes a train journey as part of the whole trip.

The 12-day Venice and Swiss Alps itineraries are among Uniworld’s first cruise and train programs to launch as part of its partnership with Golden Eagle Luxury Trains. The itinerary includes four nights crossing Western Europe aboard the Golden Eagle Danube Express before ending in Venice, where guests board the SS La Venezia to cruise the Venice Lagoon for seven nights.

The route

This cruise and train itinerary begins with an overnight stay in Zurich, Switzerland’s largest city known for being a global financial and banking center. I was not surprised to remember it while I was in town. Downtown Zurich outside the Old Town had an austere nature in its cityscape – a veritable concrete jungle. This as opposed to the cozier, more medieval Old Town, which has taken on a more familiar European look with its weathered Gothic church spiers, stone bridges spanning canals and cobbled streets filled with pockets of alleyways, of open plazas and a thriving tourist scene. .

A gateway to the old town of Zurich. Uniworld’s trip to Venice and the Swiss Alps begins with an overnight stay in the city. Photo credit: Nicole Edenedo

Guests on the Venice and the Swiss Alps itinerary will see the castles and fairytale landscapes of Liechtenstein, the alpine resorts of Austria, and tourist and emerging destinations in Slovenia. This is the shorter version of Uniworld’s original 14-day Milan, Venice and Swiss Alps itinerary, which includes two additional nights in Milan plus a day trip to Verona.

But you don’t have to visit the city of Romeo and Juliet to feel the romance of this train journey, because its beauty lies in the stretches of the journey.

All aboard for nostalgia

Anyone who likes an old-fashioned train ride, appreciates the nostalgia of a night in a sleeper, or has a penchant for good thrillers starring Alfred Hitchcock or Margaret Rutherford on Turner Classic Movies would love the cruise and Uniworld train. I’ve been a fan of the three aforementioned hobbies for quite some time, but I’ve only had the chance to do two of them; I had never done an overnight sleeper train trip before my Uniworld trip, let alone five star luxury.

And the Golden Eagle is truly five star, with impeccable service from highly skilled and talented staff, superb cuisine crafted with such precision it’s hard to believe such a detail-oriented chef had the stamina (and the patience) to create such beautifully delicious dishes aboard a moving train three times a day.

Uniworld’s cruise and train program is growing. The cruise line launched two additional itineraries earlier this year with expanded trips to Eastern Europe on the 13-day Transylvanian Castles and Enchanting Danube itinerary as well as a 12-day departure.

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Factbox-Europe travel disruption set to continue into late summer https://nomassolo.com/factbox-europe-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/factbox-europe-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer/ (Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after widespread lockdowns of COVID with disruptions expected to continue through the fall. Here is a summary of some of the key developments: LABOR UNREST After sweeping […]]]>

(Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after widespread lockdowns of COVID with disruptions expected to continue through the fall.

Here is a summary of some of the key developments:

LABOR UNREST

After sweeping job and wage cuts when COVID-19 brought travel to a halt, staff across the industry, from pilots to baggage handlers, are demanding big pay rises and better working conditions.

** Norwegian Air agreed in June to a 3.7% salary increase for pilots, among other benefits.

**SAS and Ryanair agreed terms in July with some unions representing their pilots, while British Airways and KLM signed pay deals with ground staff as strikes affected hundreds of thousands of travelers during the key period holidays.

** Lufthansa canceled around 800 flights at its main bases in Frankfurt and Munich after its pilots went on strike on Friday, affecting 130,000 passengers. The VC union, which is demanding a 5.5% pay rise this year and automatic inflation compensation thereafter, had called on more than 5,000 Lufthansa pilots to stage a 24-hour strike.

** Employees of the Portuguese airport handling company Portway began a three-day strike on August 26 at its main airports in Lisbon, Porto, Faro and Funchal, forcing the cancellation of around 90 flights.

**Members of Ryanair’s Spanish cabin crew union plan to strike from Monday to Thursday each week until January 7 to demand higher wages and better working conditions.

**EasyJet pilots based in Spain left bases in Barcelona, ​​Malaga and Palma in Mallorca for nine days in August to demand better working conditions.

Cabin crew in the country have suspended a strike scheduled for July 29-31 after reaching an agreement with the carrier. Their previous walkouts from July 1-3 and July 15-17 had caused flight cancellations and delays.

**IAG’s low-cost airline Iberia Express has canceled 92 flights after cabin crew union USO announced a 10-day strike starting August 28.

CUTS SCHEDULE

Airlines such as Lufthansa, British Airways, easyJet, KLM and Wizz Air have cut thousands of flights from their summer schedules in an attempt to reduce disruption, while major airports including London Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol have extended the number of passengers until the fall.

** After previously reducing its summer schedule and halting ticket sales for short-haul flights from Heathrow until mid-August, British Airways announced on August 22 that it would be carrying out new cancellations until the end of October, after the airport extended its cap on passenger departures. It will also reduce its winter schedule by 8%, impacting around 10,000 flights.

**However, London Gatwick Airport does not plan to extend passenger number limits beyond the end of August as it has beefed up security staff, while a Lufthansa board member said the worst of the flight chaos was over for the German airline.

HIRING AND INCENTIVES

Industry executives say it’s difficult to recruit for often physically demanding and relatively low-paying jobs at airports that are often out of town. Training new hires and getting them security cleared also takes months.

** Schiphol, one of Europe’s busiest airports, agreed to pay 15,000 cleaners, baggage handlers and security guards an additional 5.25 euros ($5.25) per hour over the summer. He had to hire 500 security guards after starting the season with about 10,000 fewer workers than before the pandemic.

**Only around 150 Turkish airport workers have been hired by German airports, far fewer than initially expected. They will help with baggage handling under temporary contracts that will run until early November.

** Airport security company ICTS, which operates at Paris Charles de Gaulle, has offered a one-off bonus of 180 euros to those who delay their holidays after September 15 and 150 euros to staff who recruit new recruits, said a CGT union representative.

($1 = 1.0007 euros)

(Reporting by Klaus Lauer in Berlin, Juliette Portala and Caroline Paillez in Paris, Toby Sterling in Amsterdam, Paul Sandle in London and Reuters offices; Compiled by Boleslaw Lasocki, Antonis Triantafyllou, Tiago Brandao and Marie Mannes in Gdansk; Editing by Kirsten Donovan and Milla Nissi)

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Travel to Europe: Why Spring is the Best Time to Visit the City’s Sights https://nomassolo.com/travel-to-europe-why-spring-is-the-best-time-to-visit-the-citys-sights/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 06:31:53 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/travel-to-europe-why-spring-is-the-best-time-to-visit-the-citys-sights/ Summer travel often steals the show, but if you want to see the sights without the crowds, you can’t beat Europe in the spring, writes Sarah Pollok We know that Europe and summer go together like Aperol and sunsets, but if you prefer a holiday without the massive crowds, scorching temperatures and high prices, April […]]]>

Summer travel often steals the show, but if you want to see the sights without the crowds, you can’t beat Europe in the spring, writes Sarah Pollok

We know that Europe and summer go together like Aperol and sunsets, but if you prefer a holiday without the massive crowds, scorching temperatures and high prices, April and May are the perfect time to visit.

Here are a few towns that bloom bigger and brighter than others during this slow season.

Ljubljana, Slovenia

If you’re looking for a city that thrives in spring, Europe’s greenest and most livable capital is a good place to start. With flower baskets hanging along cobblestone streets, emerald bushes lining the edge of charming canals, and large parks filled with trees and flowers, Ljubljana (pronounced loo-blee-yana) comes alive in April.

After walking among the flowers of Grajski gric park, exploring Ljubljana Castle and taking a canoe on the canals, the natural beauty of Lake Bled, Postojna Caves and the mountain town of Radovjica are all within a hour.

Seville, Spain

Spain is a fan favorite for those traveling through Europe, and if you’re there in the spring, Seville is the city to visit. Considered one of the most beautiful cities in the country, the land of tapas, oranges and flamenco is full of things to see and do.

April is a particularly special time as you can witness two of Seville’s biggest celebrations. The month begins with street parties and art installations for Holy Week (an important time in the Christian calendar) followed two weeks later by the Feria de Abril. Traditionally, the multi-day celebration was a time to trade cattle, but has since evolved into a festive carnival full of food, dancing and fancy costumes.

Lisse, Netherlands

With spring comes the season for soft, colorful flowers and few places are better to see them take over a city than in “the flower shop of the world”, Lisse. Nestled between Haarlem and The Hague, this small town in the Netherlands is overrun with stunning flowers every March, especially in the famous Keukenhof Gardens.

Also known as the “Gardens of Europe”, the 32-hectare garden is an incredible spectacle that attracts millions of visitors in just 8 weeks. Numbers have been capped this year due to Covid-19, so if you want to see fields teeming with vibrant Dutch tulips, you’ll need to plan ahead.

For the best tulips in the world, go to Lisse.  Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30
For the best tulips in the world, go to Lisse. Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30

Tuscany, Rome

In another corner of Europe, the Italian region of Tuscany takes on color with its own type of flower, the humble poppy. For the best views, head to the UNESCO-listed Val d’Orcia region, where verdant hills dotted with cypresses and quaint farmhouses are streaked pink and red with hundreds of thousands of small flowers.

And don’t be surprised if you see it featured in a restaurant dish or two during a meal. Even better, you can enjoy the beautiful Italian countryside before the summer heat sets in.

Tuscany is beautiful any time of the year, but especially in the spring.  Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30
Tuscany is beautiful any time of the year, but especially in the spring. Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30

Dublin, Ireland

If you’re looking for an old-fashioned good time, Dublin is the perfect place for spring. The popular capital does not wait for summer to organize a festival. The festivities begin with the famous St. Patrick’s Day Festival, a four-day affair in mid-March with a packed schedule of food, arts and more.

Meanwhile, Late May features Bloom in the Park; Ireland’s largest garden festival, taking place over 28 acres in beautiful Phoenix Park. In between are weeks of events celebrating everything from music and food to comics and theater.

Zürich, Switzerland

Switzerland may be a world-class winter destination, but the mountains and lakes take on a whole new beauty when they start to melt. In Zurich, April marks the return of longer days and warmer weather; a time when you can enjoy weekly farmers markets, beautiful hiking trails and lakeside picnics.

The end of winter is celebrated in the city with an annual four-day spring festival called Sechselauten. Scheduled for April 14-17, 2023, the festivities include colorful parades, performances and the lighting of a bonfire topped by a snowman named Boogg. Legend has it that the faster the fire reaches the snowman’s head, the better the summer will be.

Zurich is known for its breathtaking winters, but it's just as pretty in the spring.  Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30
Zurich is known for its breathtaking winters, but it’s just as pretty in the spring. Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30

Vienna, Austria

In the heart of Europe, Vienna is a popular place for all travelers and although it is beautiful at any time of the year, the Austrian capital is particularly pretty in spring. More than 400 types of roses are blooming in the Volksgarten, public parks are blooming with fresh cherry blossoms, and the famous orangery at Schönbrunn Palace is starting to bloom.

A cultural buzz also blossoms in April as people are drawn to the streets by the warmer weather and Easter markets. If you’re visiting in May, plan your trip to see the beloved Genussfestival in Stadtpark; a multi-day event dedicated to the best of traditional Austrian food and drink.

Summer can be a popular time to visit Europe, but spring is the best time for these cities.  Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30
Summer can be a popular time to visit Europe, but spring is the best time for these cities. Photo / Unsplash For Trav August 30

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Factbox: European travel disruption set to continue into late summer https://nomassolo.com/factbox-european-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 14:29:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/factbox-european-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer/ Aug 26 (Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after the widespread COVID lockdowns with disruptions expected to continue through the fall. Read more Here is a summary of some of the key developments: […]]]>

Aug 26 (Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after the widespread COVID lockdowns with disruptions expected to continue through the fall. Read more

Here is a summary of some of the key developments:

LABOR UNREST

After sweeping job and wage cuts when COVID-19 brought travel to a halt, staff across the industry, from pilots to baggage handlers, are demanding big pay rises and better working conditions.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

** Norwegian Air (NAS.OL) agreed in June to a 3.7% salary increase for pilots, among other benefits. Read more .

**SAS (SAS.ST) and Ryanair (RYA.I) agreed terms in July with some unions representing their pilots, while British Airways (ICAG.L) and KLM (AIRF.PA) signed pay deals with ground staff, as strikes affected hundreds of thousands of travelers during the key holiday period. Read more

** Portuguese airports

Employees of the Portuguese airport handling company Portway began a three-day strike on Friday at its main airports in Lisbon, Porto, Faro and Funchal, forcing the cancellation of around 90 flights. Read more

** Lufthansa (LHAG.DE)

The pilots of the German flag carrier voted on July 31 in favor of a strike. Their VC union is demanding a 5.5% wage increase this year for its pilots and automatic inflation compensation thereafter. On Thursday, VC said the pilots had rejected a pay offer and could strike at any time. Read more

**Ryanair (RYA.I)

Members of Ryanair’s Spanish cabin crew union plan to strike from Monday to Thursday each week until January 7 to demand higher wages and better working conditions. Read more

Ryanair workers also caused disruption at many Spanish airports by marching for several days in July, mainly at weekends.

** Easyjet (EZJ.L)

Easyjet pilots in Spain said they would strike for nine days in August from bases in Barcelona, ​​Malaga and Palma in Mallorca. Read more

However, the country’s cabin crew suspended a strike scheduled for July 29-31 after reaching an agreement with the company. Workers went on strike on July 1-3 and July 15-17, causing flight cancellations and delays. Read more

** IAG (ICAG.L)

Low-cost airline IAG Iberia Express has canceled 92 flights after cabin crew union USO announced a 10-day strike starting August 28.

CUTS SCHEDULE

Airlines such as Lufthansa, British Airways, easyJet, KLM and Wizz Air have cut thousands of flights from their summer schedules in an attempt to reduce disruption, while major airports including London Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol have extended the number of passengers until the fall.

** After previously slashing its summer schedule and halting ticket sales for short-haul flights from Heathrow until mid-August, British Airways announced this week that it would be making further cancellations until the end of October after the airport extended its cap on passenger departures. It will also reduce its winter schedule by 8%, impacting around 10,000 flights. Read more

**Schiphol has also extended its passenger cap until October. Read more

**However, London Gatwick Airport does not plan to extend existing limits on passenger numbers beyond the end of August as it has beefed up security staff, while a board member from Lufthansa said the worst of the flight chaos was over for the German airline. Read more

HIRING AND INCENTIVES

Industry executives say it’s difficult to recruit for often physically demanding and relatively low-paying jobs at airports that are often out of town. Training new hires and getting them security cleared also takes months.

** Schiphol, one of Europe’s busiest airports, agreed to pay 15,000 cleaners, baggage handlers and security guards an additional 5.25 euros ($5.50) per hour over the summer. He had to hire 500 security guards after starting the season with about 10,000 fewer workers than before the pandemic. Read more

**Only around 150 Turkish airport workers will be deployed at German airports, far fewer than originally planned. They will help with baggage handling under temporary contracts that will run until early November. Read more

** Airport security company ICTS, which operates at Charles de Gaulle, has offered a one-time bonus of 180 euros to those who delay their holidays after September 15 and 150 euros to staff who take on new recruits, a representative said CGT union.

($1 = 0.9933 euros)

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Klaus Lauer in Berlin, Juliette Portala and Caroline Paillez in Paris, Toby Sterling in Amsterdam, Paul Sandle in London and Reuters bureaus; Compiled by Boleslaw Lasocki, Antonis Triantafyllou, Tiago Brandao and Marie Mannes in Gdansk; Editing by Milla Nissi, Louise Heavens, Kirsten Donovan

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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European travel disruption set to continue into late summer By Reuters https://nomassolo.com/european-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer-by-reuters/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/european-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer-by-reuters/ © Reuters. People line up at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, June 16, 2022. REUTERS/Piroschka van de Wouw/File Photo (Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after widespread lockdowns of COVID with disruptions […]]]>

© Reuters. People line up at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, June 16, 2022. REUTERS/Piroschka van de Wouw/File Photo

(Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after widespread lockdowns of COVID with disruptions expected to continue through the fall.

Here is a summary of some of the key developments:

LABOR UNREST

After sweeping job and wage cuts when COVID-19 brought travel to a halt, staff across the industry, from pilots to baggage handlers, are demanding big pay rises and better working conditions.

** Norwegian Air in June agreed to a 3.7% pay rise for pilots, among other benefits.

**SAS and Ryanair agreed terms in July with some unions representing their pilots, while British Airways and KLM signed pay deals with ground staff as strikes affected hundreds of thousands of travelers during the key period holidays.

** Portuguese airports

Employees of the Portuguese airport handling company Portway began a three-day strike on Friday at its main airports in Lisbon, Porto, Faro and Funchal, forcing the cancellation of around 90 flights.

**Lufthansa

The pilots of the German flag carrier voted on July 31 in favor of a strike. Their VC union is demanding a 5.5% wage increase this year for its pilots and automatic inflation compensation thereafter. On Thursday, VC said the pilots had rejected a pay offer and could strike at any time.

**Ryanair

Members of Ryanair’s Spanish cabin crew union plan to strike from Monday to Thursday each week until January 7 to demand higher wages and better working conditions.

Ryanair workers also caused disruption at many Spanish airports by marching for several days in July, mainly at weekends.

** Easyjet

Easyjet pilots in Spain said they would strike for nine days in August from bases in Barcelona, ​​Malaga and Palma in Mallorca.

However, the country’s cabin crew suspended a strike scheduled for July 29-31 after reaching an agreement with the company. Workers went on strike on July 1-3 and July 15-17, causing flight cancellations and delays.

** IAG (LON:)

Low-cost airline IAG Iberia Express has canceled 92 flights after the USO cabin crew union (NYSE:) announced a 10-day strike starting Aug. 28.

CUTS SCHEDULE

Airlines such as Lufthansa, British Airways, easyJet (LON:), KLM and Wizz Air have cut thousands of flights from their summer schedules to try to reduce disruption, while major airports including London Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, have extended the number of passengers until the fall.

** After previously slashing its summer schedule and halting ticket sales for short-haul flights from Heathrow until mid-August, British Airways announced this week that it would be making further cancellations until the end of October after the airport extended its cap on passenger departures. It will also reduce its winter schedule by 8%, impacting around 10,000 flights.

**Schiphol has also extended its passenger cap until October.

**However, London Gatwick Airport does not plan to extend existing limits on passenger numbers beyond the end of August as it has beefed up security staff, while a board member from Lufthansa said the worst of the flight chaos was over for the German airline.

HIRING AND INCENTIVES

Industry executives say it’s difficult to recruit for often physically demanding and relatively low-paying jobs at airports that are often out of town. Training new hires and getting them security cleared also takes months.

** Schiphol, one of Europe’s busiest airports, agreed to pay 15,000 cleaners, baggage handlers and security guards an additional 5.25 euros ($5.50) per hour over the summer. He had to hire 500 security guards after starting the season with about 10,000 fewer workers than before the pandemic.

**Only around 150 Turkish airport workers will be deployed at German airports, far fewer than originally planned. They will help with baggage handling under temporary contracts that will run until early November.

** Airport security company ICTS, which operates at Charles de Gaulle, has offered a one-time bonus of 180 euros to those who delay their holidays after September 15 and 150 euros to staff who take on new recruits, a representative said CGT union.

($1 = 0.9933 euros)

]]>
European travel disruption set to continue into late summer https://nomassolo.com/european-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/european-travel-disruption-set-to-continue-into-late-summer/ (Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after widespread lockdowns of COVID with disruptions expected to continue through the fall. Here is a summary of some of the key developments: LABOR UNREST After sweeping […]]]>

(Reuters) – Strikes and staff shortages have forced airlines to cancel thousands of flights to avoid hour-long queues at major airports, dashing hopes of a scorching first summer after widespread lockdowns of COVID with disruptions expected to continue through the fall.

Here is a summary of some of the key developments:

LABOR UNREST

After sweeping job and wage cuts when COVID-19 brought travel to a halt, staff across the industry, from pilots to baggage handlers, are demanding big pay rises and better working conditions.

** Norwegian Air in June agreed to a 3.7% pay rise for pilots, among other benefits.

**SAS and Ryanair agreed terms in July with some unions representing their pilots, while British Airways and KLM signed pay deals with ground staff as strikes affected hundreds of thousands of travelers during the key period holidays.

** Portuguese airports

Employees of Portuguese airport handling company Portway began a three-day strike at its main airports in Lisbon, Porto, Faro and Funchal on Friday, forcing the cancellation of around 90 flights.

**Lufthansa

The pilots of the German flag carrier voted on July 31 in favor of a strike. Their VC union is demanding a 5.5% wage increase this year for its pilots and automatic inflation compensation thereafter. On Thursday, VC said the pilots had rejected a pay offer and could strike at any time.

**Ryanair

Members of Ryanair’s Spanish cabin crew union plan to strike from Monday to Thursday each week until January 7 to demand higher wages and better working conditions.

Ryanair workers also caused disruption at many Spanish airports by marching for several days in July, mainly at weekends.

** Easy jet

Easyjet pilots in Spain said they would strike for nine days in August from bases in Barcelona, ​​Malaga and Palma in Mallorca.

However, the country’s cabin crew suspended a strike scheduled for July 29-31 after reaching an agreement with the company. Workers went on strike on July 1-3 and July 15-17, causing flight cancellations and delays.

** AGI

Low-cost airline IAG Iberia Express has canceled 92 flights after cabin crew union USO announced a 10-day strike starting August 28.

CUTS SCHEDULE

Airlines such as Lufthansa, British Airways, easyJet, KLM and Wizz Air have cut thousands of flights from their summer schedules in an attempt to reduce disruption, while major airports including London Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol have extended the number of passengers until the fall.

** After previously slashing its summer schedule and halting ticket sales for short-haul flights from Heathrow until mid-August, British Airways announced this week that it would be making further cancellations until the end of October after the airport extended its cap on passenger departures. It will also reduce its winter schedule by 8%, impacting around 10,000 flights.

**Schiphol has also extended its passenger cap until October.

**However, London Gatwick Airport does not plan to extend existing limits on passenger numbers beyond the end of August as it has beefed up security staff, while a board member from Lufthansa said the worst of the flight chaos was over for the German airline.

HIRING AND INCENTIVES

Industry executives say it’s difficult to recruit for often physically demanding and relatively low-paying jobs at airports that are often out of town. Training new hires and getting them security cleared also takes months.

** Schiphol, one of Europe’s busiest airports, agreed to pay 15,000 cleaners, baggage handlers and security guards an additional 5.25 euros ($5.50) per hour over the summer. He had to hire 500 security guards after starting the season with about 10,000 fewer workers than before the pandemic.

**Only around 150 Turkish airport workers will be deployed at German airports, far fewer than originally planned. They will help with baggage handling under temporary contracts that will run until early November.

** Airport security company ICTS, which operates at Charles de Gaulle, has offered a one-time bonus of 180 euros to those who delay their holidays after September 15 and 150 euros to staff who take on new recruits, a representative said CGT union.

($1 = 0.9933 euros)

(Reporting by Klaus Lauer in Berlin, Juliette Portala and Caroline Paillez in Paris, Toby Sterling in Amsterdam, Paul Sandle in London and Reuters offices; Compiled by Boleslaw Lasocki, Antonis Triantafyllou, Tiago Brandao and Marie Mannes in Gdansk; Editing by Milla Nissi , Louise Heavens, Kirsten Donovan)

]]>
Kremlin dissidents warn that European travel bans against Russians are actually helping Vladimir Putin https://nomassolo.com/kremlin-dissidents-warn-that-european-travel-bans-against-russians-are-actually-helping-vladimir-putin/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 03:57:51 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/kremlin-dissidents-warn-that-european-travel-bans-against-russians-are-actually-helping-vladimir-putin/ Kremlin critics around the world are mobilizing against moves by some European countries to impose travel bans on Russian citizens, arguing that it will have the opposite effect of increasing pressure on Vladimir Putin to end the war in Ukraine. Many of Russia’s top public figures, including celebrities, politicians and journalists with anti-war views, have […]]]>

Kremlin critics around the world are mobilizing against moves by some European countries to impose travel bans on Russian citizens, arguing that it will have the opposite effect of increasing pressure on Vladimir Putin to end the war in Ukraine.

Many of Russia’s top public figures, including celebrities, politicians and journalists with anti-war views, have insisted such bans will backfire. “Do they believe that furious Russians left without European visas would grab a pitchfork and attack the Kremlin? No, they won’t,” legendary Russian rock musician Andrew Makarevich said earlier this week.

Many Russians are already suffering from the ban. When Russian media official Igor Zabotin attempted to enter Romania from Ukraine on Tuesday, Ukrainian border guards stamped his passport with the words: “Russian warship, fuck you,” a slogan popularized by Ukrainian servicemen who said the phrase to a Russian military ship near Snake Island in the early days of the war.

In an interview with The Daily Beast, Zabotin, a former digital manager of Moscow time, said he had been in Ukraine since the very first day of the war. “There are not many Russian citizens living in Ukraine, most of us are sitting at home without traveling. I have never heard of other cases like mine, of border guards stamping a passport with this slogan,” Zabotin told The Daily Beast. “But Ukrainian border guards just stamped my passport and Romania wouldn’t let me in.” Romania is among several EU countries that have introduced new restrictions and tightened entry rules for Russian citizens.

When the conflict erupted in 2014, Zabotin protested with Ukrainian flags in Moscow and posted photos on his social media pages. “If it’s a crime to love Ukraine, Borscht and the sea in Odessa, then I’m a criminal,” he wrote on his Facebook page. But his anti-war stance didn’t hold water with guards on both sides of the border – at least not right away: He was first held up in the neutral zone between the countries, “like in the movie Terminal,” he says, “And then turned back. »

This is not the Russian people’s war.

Zabotin spent 24 hours at the border, slept in his car, then decided to contact the Romanian authorities directly and ask for help. “I applied for political asylum in Romania, because the only document I have is my spoiled Russian passport – in Russia I risk 7 to 20 years in prison for my pro-Ukrainian and anti-war public position “, Zabotin told The Daily Beast. Friday. “I had to search for my photos during pro-Ukrainian protests which I posted on Facebook in 2014 and presented to the Romanian authorities at the border. They finally let me in.

On August 31, foreign ministers from EU member countries will meet in Prague to discuss a possible outright ban on Russians crossing the bloc. Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas urged earlier this month: “Stop issuing visas to Russians. Visiting Europe is a privilege, not a human right. Around the same time, Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin said: “It is not right that at the same time that Russia is waging an aggressive and brutal war of aggression in Europe, Russians can lead a normal life , traveling in Europe, being tourists. That’s not true.” Some countries, including Latvia, have completely halted tourism cooperation with Russia; and Estonia stopped admitting Russians with travel visas on Friday.

But Zabotin says this approach is counterproductive: “The idea of ​​locking people up so they can’t see anything outside their bubble is not the development of civilization.”

The son of famous Russian LGBT activist and blogger Karen Shainyan was living in Kyiv when Putin sent his army to Ukraine. Karen was among the first Russians to speak out against the war, which eventually earned her a “foreign agent” designation from Russia. He now lives in exile in Berlin, working as a TV presenter at the OstWest TV channel. “It’s a shame,” that European countries that originally welcomed Russian independent media and opposition activists three months ago are now barring Russians from entering, Karen told The Daily Beast. “Journalists from all independent Russian media, against Dozhd TV, Kholod and Novaya Gazeta, have done nothing wrong in the past three months.”

He continued: “If during the Cold War it was Moscow that closed the Iron Curtain, now it is the West and not the Kremlin that is closing the door on the Russians, as Trump did on the Mexicans and it makes Putin happy.”

Some world leaders agree. “This is not the Russian people’s war. This is Putin’s war and we have to be very clear about that,” German Chancellor Olaf Scholz said earlier this week, declining to back calls for a ban. European tourist visas for Russians.

Prominent political observer and freelance journalist Olga Bychkova strongly believes that European leaders should not impose collective punishment on Russians. “The Russian authorities crossed the red line a long time ago, they don’t care how many people they throw in jail or how many fighters they use as cannon fodder – all political protests in Russia will end in more repressions, ruined careers and often violence,” Bychkova told The Daily Beast. “But it seems EU countries banning visas for Russians aren’t keen on understanding the 50 shades of gray Russian.”

More than two million Russians own property in the EU, many of whom are rushing to obtain permanent resident status in anticipation of new travel bans. A Russian film producer, Alyona, 40, has owned a house in Spain for seven years, but has only just applied for a residence permit. “Russia at war is not where I want to raise my children,” she told the Daily Beast.

Thousands of Russians who do not support Putin’s assault on Ukraine continue to flee to Israel, Georgia, Armenia, Serbia, Dubai and other EU countries. In recent days, the number of Russians applying for travel visas has increased by 40%, according to Kommersant.

Imprisoned Russian opposition leader Aleksey Navalny has a clear message for the West about who their main targets for sanctions should be – targets that would help divide Russia’s elite, instead of bringing Russians back to life ordinary more difficult.

“I call on voters and lawmakers in the EU, UK, US and Canada to put pressure on [Russia’s] executive and urgently impose massive personal sanctions against Putin’s thieves,” read a statement on Navalny’s Twitter account on Tuesday.

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