Europe guide – Nomas Solo http://nomassolo.com/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 22:01:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nomassolo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Europe guide – Nomas Solo http://nomassolo.com/ 32 32 The best and worst airports and airlines for delays now https://nomassolo.com/the-best-and-worst-airports-and-airlines-for-delays-now/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 20:10:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/the-best-and-worst-airports-and-airlines-for-delays-now/ The summer of ‘revenge travel’ across Europe means it pays to know which airports are experiencing … [+] the fewest delays Getty Images Anyone taking a trip to Europe this summer could do worse than pay attention to where delays and blockages are occurring. New data shows some of the best and worst offenders for […]]]>

Anyone taking a trip to Europe this summer could do worse than pay attention to where delays and blockages are occurring. New data shows some of the best and worst offenders for early July. If there is an option, it might be a good idea to change direction and head to some of the best airports listed here.

The worst airports for delays/cancellations in early July

Hopper Inc is an online travel agency that uses big data from the Official Aviation Guide, a leading provider of digital flight information and analysis for airports.

Recently released data from Hopper provides an up-to-date guide to the worst airports in Europe right now, as reported Bloomberg:

  1. Brussels Airport (BRU), Belgium—72% delayed, 2.5% canceled
  2. Frankfurt International Airport (FRA), Germany — 68% delayed, 7.8% canceled
  3. Eindhoven Airport (EIN), Netherlands—67% delayed, 1.8% canceled
  4. Luton Airport (LTN), UK — 66% delayed, 2.7% canceled
  5. Liszt Ferenc International Airport (BUD), Hungary — 65% delayed, 2.1% canceled
  6. Lisbon Airport (LIS), Portugal—65% delayed, 4.8% canceled
  7. Charles De Gaulle Airport (CDG), France — 62% delayed, 3.1% canceled
  8. Schiphol Airport (AMS), Netherlands — 61% delayed, 5.2% canceled
  9. Côte d’Azur Airport (NCE), France—60% delayed, 3.4% canceled
  10. Gatwick Airport (LGW), UK — 59% delayed, 1.4% canceled

The statistics were taken from July 1-9 and provide an absolute picture of flights, not relative. For example, Heathrow is not on the list, although its delays may have had a significant impact on more travelers despite not being as long or onerous.

The best airports for delays/cancellations in early July

And in turn, the best airports can also be identified, using the same data from Hopper:

  1. Bergamo/Orio al Serio Airport (BGY), Italy—3% delayed, 1.0% canceled
  2. Gran Canaria Airport (LPA), Spain—8% delayed, 0.3% canceled
  3. Otopeni International Airport (OTP), Bucharest, Romania — 10% delayed, 1.7% canceled
  4. Dublin International Airport (DUB), Ireland — 15% delayed, 1.6% canceled
  5. Fontanarossa Airport (CTA), Catania, Italy—16% delayed, 1.1% canceled
  6. Adolfo Suarez-Barajas Airport (MAD), Madrid, Spain — 19% delay, 0.4% cancellation
  7. Alicante Airport (ALC), Spain—20% delayed, 3.4% canceled
  8. Marseille Airport (MRS), France—20% delayed, 2.0% canceled
  9. Orly Field (ORY), Paris, France — 21% delay, 1.2% cancellation
  10. Malaga Airport (AGP), Spain—24% delayed, 3.3% canceled

Looking at the data, it is clear that it might be wise, if there is still time, to choose some of the less fashionable French airports, such as Marseille and Orly in Paris, rather than those such as Nice (9th worst) and Paris Charles de Gaulle (7th worst).

The top ten airlines for cancellations in Europe

Data from Mabrian, the travel intelligence platform, provides an overview of the top ten airlines for flight cancellations currently in Europe:

  1. easyJet
  2. Turkish Airlines
  3. Scandinavian airlines
  4. Wizz Air
  5. Vueling
  6. TUI fly
  7. Wizz France
  8. United
  9. Air Europe
  10. Saudi Arabia

It should be noted that this does not provide the complete picture. easyJet operates far more flights than any other of these carriers and therefore cancels fewer flights, if taken as a percentage of their capacity (5.5% of its flights).

Tips for Easing Travel Chaos

There are several things to ensure as little disruption as possible: fly as early in the day as possible, leave a buffer day for connecting connections, and be/stay flexible to get there and back. Experts have also warned that it’s best not to travel with checked baggage this summer, if possible.

Above all, buy good travel insurance for expensive trips. Hopper has seen a 31% increase in the number of travelers adding a flight disruption guarantee to their bookings in recent weeks. In the event of a disruption, travelers can book immediately on ANY carrier and catch the next flight for free, or receive a refund.

A list of current travel restrictions in Europe due to Covid-19 can be found here.

]]>
Europe’s travel chaos is a warning for South African travelers – SAPeople https://nomassolo.com/europes-travel-chaos-is-a-warning-for-south-african-travelers-sapeople/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 15:00:55 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/europes-travel-chaos-is-a-warning-for-south-african-travelers-sapeople/ Europe’s travel chaos is a wake-up call for South African travellers. Photo by Anete Lusina on Unsplash JOHANNESBURG, July 14, 2022 – The travel industry has almost fully recovered, with travel numbers approaching pre-pandemic numbers. But bringing travel back is proving more difficult than most in the travel industry would have expected. Post-COVID staffing shortages […]]]>
Europe’s travel chaos is a wake-up call for South African travellers. Photo by Anete Lusina on Unsplash

JOHANNESBURG, July 14, 2022 – The travel industry has almost fully recovered, with travel numbers approaching pre-pandemic numbers. But bringing travel back is proving more difficult than most in the travel industry would have expected. Post-COVID staffing shortages are having a serious impact on service delivery in the travel and tourism industry in Europe and the United States. And – sadly – South Africa is not immune to disruption.

Travelers in Europe report flight cancellations, slow or lost luggage and huge queues at security and passport control. Mostly Heathrow in the UK and Schiphol in the Netherlands are reporting disruptions (but it’s a similar story at airports in Germany, Belgium and several other countries). Meanwhile, in the United States, American Airlines and United Airlines have announced a reduction in domestic services as airlines grapple with a shortage of pilots.

“Just as we thought the travel industry might finally turn the page with the lifting of COVID restrictions, we are seeing a new round of disruption,” says Oz Desai, GM Corporate Traveler. “Across Europe, airports are reducing the number of flights they can handle for the coming months, which has a big impact on flight availability. The number of canceled flights in Europe each week is currently estimated at several thousand.

Lack of experienced and competent staff

The main reason for the disruptions is the lack of experienced and competent staff. The
The pandemic has forced many in the travel industry to make drastic staff reductions to survive. Hundreds
Thousands of aviation, hospitality and tourism workers have been laid off, with years of experience and technical expertise taken from the industry. For instance, US airlines have laid off more than 84,000 employees from February to October 2020, according to data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

When travel demand returned this year, a hiring spree began. However, the talented people laid off in 2020 have found jobs elsewhere and are in no rush to return to the travel industry. The lack of knowledge and expertise is felt most in the aviation industry, but has also spilled over into the hospitality and car rental sectors.

In addition, the ongoing war in Ukraine continues to significantly restrict available airspace in Europe. This leads to huge bottlenecks in the sky and therefore, unfortunately, to further flight delays.

Rise in demand for services from travel management companies to be “safe”

For business travelers, working with a reliable travel management company (TMC) has become more important than ever, says Desai. “Travel has gotten more complicated, fares have skyrocketed, visa delays are common, and travelers want the reassurance of having a professional by their side when faced with airline delays and cancellations or baggage accidents. They look to their TMC to ensure that the vendors they select will deliver on their promises.

According to Desai, TMCs have seen demand for their services increase exponentially after the South African government relaxed most COVID regulations. Bookings are increasing as well as the amount of TMC work per booking as travel has become much more complicated.

At the Business Travel Show Europe, a travel speaker mentioned that the average number of the calls its travelers make to their TMC to arrange travel have risen from three before the pandemic to 14 today. This closely matched figures provided by Clive Wratten, chief executive of TMC, the Business Travel Association: its members reported an increase of four calls per booking to 14-20.

Travelers are also increasingly looking for human assistance simply because the travel landscape is so unreliable. At the Business Travel Show, some travelers mentioned that they had bad experiences booking hotels online only to find the hotel closed upon arrival for check-in.

Due to the increased pressure on TMCs, Desai says Corporate Traveler has taken several drastic measures, including hiring more staff, adding more shifts for consultants to bolster round-the-clock service and the development of current staff.

While TMCs are working hard to make the traveler’s journey as smooth as possible, Desai says it’s important for businesses and travelers to take note of the current disruptions and also adapt their booking and travel behavior.

“We encourage our customers to book as early as possible. Not only will this help ensure availability, but it will also help the business manage travel expenses,” says Desai.

Desai adds that businesses should consider adopting the technology again, especially when it comes to simple routes. “Technology has become intuitive and hyper-personal. The new booking tools are user-friendly and global, and travelers benefit from real-time access to relevant travel safety information. Meanwhile, travel managers receive full traveler tracking capabilities, allowing them to immediately see who is traveling, when and where,” he says, adding that a consultant will always be on hand when needed.

It will take some time for things to normalize in the travel industry. Disruption at airports in Europe and the United States is expected to continue while South African airspace will take some time to adjust to the loss of kulula and Comair.

However, there is light at the end of the tunnel. “Almost all companies in the travel and tourism industry have indicated that they are in the process of recruiting new employees. Although this increase in capacity will only have the desired stabilizing effect in a few months, the industry working on a solution,” says Desai.

Lufthansa has indicated that by mid-2023 we can expect a much more reliable air transport system worldwide with more air capacity and modernized fleets. The airline is returning the A380 to service from 2023 and has bolstered its fleet with 50 new long-haul aircraft and 60 new Airbus A320/321s over the next three years.

“The pandemic has taught us how to navigate uncertainty and manage disruption. As long as we work together in an open and transparent manner, we can minimize travel friction and create a rewarding, profitable and enjoyable business travel experience,” concludes Desai.

]]>
ACT records first two cases after trip to Europe https://nomassolo.com/act-records-first-two-cases-after-trip-to-europe/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 02:50:12 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/act-records-first-two-cases-after-trip-to-europe/ Two cases of monkeypox have been recorded in the ACT, two travelers who returned to Canberra from Europe. Monkeypox is a rare viral infection commonly associated with travel to Central and West Africa. However, since May dozens of countries that are not endemic for the virus have reported more than 9,000 cases, mostly in Europe […]]]>

Two cases of monkeypox have been recorded in the ACT, two travelers who returned to Canberra from Europe.

Monkeypox is a rare viral infection commonly associated with travel to Central and West Africa.

However, since May dozens of countries that are not endemic for the virus have reported more than 9,000 cases, mostly in Europe and also in the United States.

In Australia, there have been two dozen cases of monkeypox in Australia, including 16 in New South Wales, six in Victoria and one in South Australia and one in Queensland.

On Wednesday, ACT Health identified the first two cases of the virus in the nation’s capital.

ACT Health said both cases had traveled to Europe and recently returned to Canberra. Both are self-isolating at home and have reported mild symptoms.

ACT Chief Health Officer Dr Kerryn Coleman said the risk of community transmission was low and the disease did not spread easily between people.

She said onward transmission of monkeypox would normally require direct skin-to-skin contact or prolonged face-to-face contact.

“Disease associated with monkeypox virus is usually mild, although complications can occur,” Dr. Coleman said.

“Symptoms may initially include fever, chills, muscle aches, back pain and swollen lymph nodes.

“Following these symptoms, a rash usually develops, which spreads to other parts of the body. The rash changes and goes through stages, like chickenpox, before finally becoming a scab.

“If you have these symptoms you should stay home and phone your GP clinic to arrange a telehealth appointment first, or you can call the Canberra Sexual Health Clinic on (02) 5124 2184 .”

Cases of monkeypox recover within weeks, but symptoms can be very painful

Many of the cases in the new international outbreak of monkeypox are men who have sex with men. However, the WHO has warned against stigma and stressed that the virus can be transmitted to anyone.

Although monkeypox can be serious, the US CDC has reported that most cases in the new outbreak recover fully within two to four weeks, without requiring treatment.

Monkeypox is spread through skin-to-skin contact, contact with contaminated objects or surfaces, or prolonged exposure to respiratory droplets.

Over the past month, gay men in the United States have shared their painful and uncomfortable experiences of contracting monkeypox, including a gay man in a candid public service announcement on TikTok.

Earlier this week, Queensland Health recorded the state’s first confirmed case of monkeypox, a resident of Brisbane.

Last week, NSW Health warned they believed two of the state’s 16 cases were likely contracted in Australia.

Dr Jeremy McAnulty of NSW Health said at the time local transmission could occur, particularly among men who have sex with men.

“People should be aware of the symptoms of monkeypox, which can include fever, headache, body aches and a rash or lesions on the genital area,” he said.

“So far, in the cases we’ve seen in New South Wales, monkeypox doesn’t present as some people expect, such as a widespread rash or lesions all over the body.

“It could be just a few of what appear to be pimples in the genital area or buttocks, so people should pay close attention to any potential symptoms.

For the latest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) news in Australia, visit qnews.com.au. Consult our latest magazines or find us on Facebook, TwitterInstagram and YouTube.

]]>
The dollar and the euro are equal – what this means for travel in Europe https://nomassolo.com/the-dollar-and-the-euro-are-equal-what-this-means-for-travel-in-europe/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/the-dollar-and-the-euro-are-equal-what-this-means-for-travel-in-europe/ As the US dollar continues to rally against foreign currencies, Americans’ vacation budgets are getting a welcome boost. Share this article IIf it’s been a while since you’ve traveled to Europe, you might be in for a welcome exchange rate surprise. Over the past year, the dollar-euro exchange rate has continued to decline. And on […]]]>

As the US dollar continues to rally against foreign currencies, Americans’ vacation budgets are getting a welcome boost.

Share this article

IIf it’s been a while since you’ve traveled to Europe, you might be in for a welcome exchange rate surprise. Over the past year, the dollar-euro exchange rate has continued to decline. And on Tuesday, one euro was valued at the equivalent of one US dollar, marking the first time the two currencies had reached parity since December 2002.

At press time, the Euro was trading at the exact value of $1.003, so technically a fraction of a penny from parity – and it could still go up and down a bit in the hours and days to come then. that foreign exchange markets respond to constantly changing economic factors. . But a year ago, the dollar was hovering at $1.20 against the euro.

The fact that the dollar is so much stronger today against the euro should be a welcome relief for Americans heading to Europe, helping to offset the costs of skyrocketing airfares (which have been pushed higher by rising oil prices and staff shortages), and inflation which is impacting the price of everything from food to services on both sides of the pond. It could also help counter concerns that American travelers may have about reported chaos and crowds at airports such as London Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol International Airport.

The euro area includes 19 countries of the European Union: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain. On Tuesday, EU finance ministers officially approved Croatia to become the 20th member to adopt the euro as its currency in early 2023.

The dollar is also gaining ground against other currencies, including the pound sterling, which fell to a value of $1.185 on Tuesday, the lowest since March 2020, The Guardian reported. The British newspaper cited political uncertainty amid the race to replace Boris Johnson as prime minister following Johnson’s resignation and “economic gloom” as factors weighing on the pound.

For American travelers, the majority of travel to Europe over the past two decades has come with a “tax” on the exchange rate – American travelers have become accustomed to calculating 20, 30, 40, even 50 to 60 % extra above the euro rate charged for their hotel room, latte, croissant, glass of wine, or admission to the museum. What appears on our US bank statements, of course, is the dollar equivalent of what was spent in euros. For many, this added cost can serve as a rather brutal vacation reality check after a stay abroad.

Even slight variations in the exchange rate can make a big difference in the bottom line of your holiday. For example, consider your hotel stay abroad, usually one of the largest budget items (if not the largest budget item) for any trip. One of our new favorite establishments in Paris, the Hotel Paradiso, offers rooms from 176 euros per night. A year ago (at an exchange rate of $1.20 to one euro) it would have been $211 per night. Today, that translates to, well, $176 per night.

And the dollar could continue its bullish trajectory. Currency forecasting is difficult given all the complex (and often rather volatile) global economic factors at play, but Bloomberg reported on July 6 that traders are increasingly confident that the euro will soon fall below the parity with the dollar.

The dollar is rising primarily because the Federal Reserve, in its effort to quell the highest US inflation in four decades, is raising interest rates more aggressively than other countries’ central banks.

Also contributing to the attractiveness of the dollar, notes Rubeela Farooqi of High Frequency Economics, is that despite worries about a possible recession in the United States, “the American economy is on stronger footing compared to Europe. “.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

Associated Press contributed reporting. This story was originally published in May 2022 and was updated on July 12, 2022 to include current information.

>> Next: You Can Still Get A Great Flight Deal This Year: Here’s How

]]>
Lisbon airport plagued by delays and cancellations as European travel chaos continues https://nomassolo.com/lisbon-airport-plagued-by-delays-and-cancellations-as-european-travel-chaos-continues/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 15:43:33 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/lisbon-airport-plagued-by-delays-and-cancellations-as-european-travel-chaos-continues/ Air travel chaos is spreading across Europe this summer as strikes by terminal workers and airlines lead to thousands of flight cancellations. More than 100 flights to and from the Portuguese capital, Lisbon, were removed over the weekend. Thousands of passengers were caught in long queues at the airport. Portugal’s air authority, ANA, said it […]]]>

Air travel chaos is spreading across Europe this summer as strikes by terminal workers and airlines lead to thousands of flight cancellations.

More than 100 flights to and from the Portuguese capital, Lisbon, were removed over the weekend. Thousands of passengers were caught in long queues at the airport.

Portugal’s air authority, ANA, said it has put in place measures to support airlines, such as extra counters for rescheduling flights, but many families’ travel plans are already in shambles. Travelers have also complained about the lack of information from airlines about the disruption.

“They postponed our flight after the cruise left Italy,” said a woman who was waiting with her family in queues at Lisbon airport.

“We are desperate, there are old people and children. We are trying to get a flight with another airline so as not to miss the cruise.”

“This is the first time my husband has been to Brazil, he is traumatized,” added another woman.

The delays this weekend have been blamed on a variety of factors. Some sources suggest a private jet that burst a tire was to blame. Others blamed TAP airlines as airports like Faro, which have fewer TAP flights, did not suffer from the chaos over the weekend, despite increased visitor numbers.

How will long queues affect my holiday in Portugal?

Delays have been reported at Lisbon airport since mid-June. Although bosses have claimed they will almost double border control staff, union representatives expect the delays to continue.

Many travelers arriving in Lisbon have been forced to queue for hours to pass through the airport.

From July 1, Portugal has canceled all its remaining COVID trips restrictions that could help alleviate queues on arrival.

Watch the video above to learn more.

]]>
Lufthansa cancels 2,200 flights as European travel chaos mounts https://nomassolo.com/lufthansa-cancels-2200-flights-as-european-travel-chaos-mounts/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 08:05:42 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/lufthansa-cancels-2200-flights-as-european-travel-chaos-mounts/ BERLIN (BLOOMBERG) – Deutsche Lufthansa has canceled 2,200 flights after a wave of Covid-19 infections worsened staff shortages, adding to travel chaos in Europe as the crucial summer vacation period begins. The airline cut domestic German and European routes for July and August, a spokesperson said. This follows 900 cancellations announced earlier this month. Germany […]]]>

BERLIN (BLOOMBERG) – Deutsche Lufthansa has canceled 2,200 flights after a wave of Covid-19 infections worsened staff shortages, adding to travel chaos in Europe as the crucial summer vacation period begins.

The airline cut domestic German and European routes for July and August, a spokesperson said. This follows 900 cancellations announced earlier this month.

Germany and other European countries have faced a new surge in Covid-19 infections. Although less deadly than previous waves, it is causing increasing absences from workplaces, exacerbating acute labor shortages in airlines.

Travel chaos has taken hold across Europe as carriers face resurgent post-lockdown demand. Airlines have downsized during the pandemic and have been slow to rebuild, worried about the resilience of ticket sales.

Growing labor unrest as workers demand pay rises to keep up with inflation is compounding the problem, with strikes threatened or underway at airlines such as Ryanair and British Airways.

British Airways workers at London Heathrow Airport are set to strike over a pay dispute.

Unions GMB and Unite said hundreds of British Airways check-in staff backed walkouts during the peak holiday period after the carrier refused to reverse a 10% pay cut imposed during the pandemic. Unite said it would give the airline “a short window of opportunity” to restore wages before posting strike dates.

Soaring inflation has prompted aviation industry workers to step up their campaigns for pay rises, emboldened by a rapid rebound in travel coupled with an industry-wide staff shortage that has forced hubs across Europe to cancel hundreds of scheduled flights.

London Gatwick and Amsterdam Schiphol both said last week that they were capping capacity.

British Airways is particularly vulnerable to walkouts after offloading 10,000 staff during the coronavirus crisis and already having to curb operations at the busiest time of the year to minimize disruption.

Mr Luis Gallego, chief executive of IAG, the parent company of British Airways, warned on Wednesday that strikes at the airline were a distinct possibility, saying the carrier was facing a “difficult summer” and needed to speak with the employees and “link the recovery of the company with the recovery of all our people”.

British Airways, which employs around 30,000 people, said on Thursday it was disappointed with the strike vote and had offered a 10% payout to offset cuts during the pandemic, which was accepted by the majority of workers. other employees.

“We are fully committed to working together to find a solution,” the company said in a statement. “We will of course keep our customers informed of what this means for them as the situation evolves.”

]]>
Low-cost carrier launches $99 transatlantic flights to Europe https://nomassolo.com/low-cost-carrier-launches-99-transatlantic-flights-to-europe/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/low-cost-carrier-launches-99-transatlantic-flights-to-europe/ Share the article Last update 4 weeks ago A new low-cost carrier from Europe is launching transatlantic flights to Europe this week, with tickets available for as low as $99. Iceland-based new airline Play – which began operations in June last year amid the pandemic – is the latest airline to offer travelers on both […]]]>

Share the article

Last update

A new low-cost carrier from Europe is launching transatlantic flights to Europe this week, with tickets available for as low as $99. Iceland-based new airline Play – which began operations in June last year amid the pandemic – is the latest airline to offer travelers on both sides of the pond more routes between the two continents, just in time for what seems like a summer full of travel.

While Play may find it difficult to offer travelers the same class of service as established airlines that fly transatlantic, such as British Airways, one thing they won’t be beaten on is price – a decision that will be fine. welcomed by travellers, to come as travel prices reach record highs. Here’s a look at the new route Play is set to launch this week – and why it should be a great fare.

Play launches transatlantic flights – Information for travelers

One of many new airlines to emerge from the pandemic, Play has burst onto the aviation scene promising cheaper routes between the US and Europe, and has delivered so far. Play’s first transatlantic routes became active just a few months ago, starting with flights from Baltimore/Washington DC (BWI) in April, before flights to Europe from Boston (BOS) were added on following month, May 22.

Each of the airline’s routes across the Atlantic to Europe includes a stopover in Iceland – which is an international travel destination in its own right – followed by a shorter hop to mainland Europe if a traveler is heading to another European destination. With Iceland having removed all entry requirements related to Covid-19, travelers can look forward to traveling with Play and enjoying being connected in Iceland without having to worry about testing or proof of vaccination.

Play is further expanding its transatlantic operations this week, with flights from New York Stewart International Airport (SWF) to major European destinations such as Reykjavík, Dublin, Berlin, Paris and Copenhagen starting June 9. This will see travelers on both sides of the Atlantic offered even more choice when it comes to taking a summer vacation – and it could be at bargain prices.

To celebrate the launch of flights from New York, Play has unveiled an exciting promotion on fares across the Atlantic. Ticket prices between New York and Iceland for travel between August 31 and November 16 will be as low as $99, while those looking to fly a little further afield over mainland Europe can expect rates as low as $129 – low prices that are almost hard to resist.

Hailing the rapid rise of his airline, Play CEO Birgir Jónsson said the following:

“[The] The flight from New York comes less than a year after PLAY’s first-ever flight from Iceland in 2021. Despite a tough travel market, PLAY has grown further and established itself in Europe and the United States . We carried over 100,000 passengers in our first seven months of operation.

The airline has ambitious goals of serving more than one million passengers in its second year of operation, and it is clearly on track. With eye-catching prices, versatile and customizable ticket options that let travelers save on cost or splurge on comfort, and more routes from Orlando set to launch come September, Play could well establish itself as a key player in the theater of transatlantic flights. .

Concept image of traveler booking flight ticket

Read more:

US State Department updates travel advisories for 10 countries

Travel insurance that covers Covid-19 for 2022

Los Cabos Sets New Records: Why Americans Are Flocking to Cabo

↓ Join the community ↓

The Travel Off Path Community FB Group has all the latest reopening news, conversations and daily Q&As!

trip-off-road-group-1-1
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR LATEST ARTICLES

Enter your email address to subscribe to the latest travel news from Travel Off Path, straight to your inbox

Disclaimer: Current Travel Rules and Restrictions may change without notice. The decision to travel is ultimately your responsibility. Contact your consulate and/or local authorities to confirm entry of your nationality and/or any changes to travel conditions before travelling. Travel Off Path does not approve travel against government advice

]]>
Europe travel restrictions, Covid-19 testing requirements, by country, for June https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-restrictions-covid-19-testing-requirements-by-country-for-june/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/europe-travel-restrictions-covid-19-testing-requirements-by-country-for-june/ Ferragudo in Algarve, Portugal – one of the few EU countries to still have travel restrictions in … [+] square Getty While many European countries have removed Covid-19 related travel restrictions, including Italy for June, there are some countries where it is still mandatory to test and carry Covid-19 vaccination or recovery certificates. 19. Here’s […]]]>

While many European countries have removed Covid-19 related travel restrictions, including Italy for June, there are some countries where it is still mandatory to test and carry Covid-19 vaccination or recovery certificates. 19.

Here’s a look at what’s happening for June 2022.

Countries in Europe without travel restrictions

There are currently 30 destinations in Europe that do not have Covid-19 restrictions in place: Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Moldova, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom

This means that regardless of vaccination history, it is not necessary to present documents relating to the state of health of a traveler.

European countries with travel restrictions in place

The following countries still apply travel restrictions across Europe:

  • Estonia – arrivals from outside the EU/EEA must present proof of their vaccination status, recovery certificate or negative test result or they must self-isolate for 7 days.
  • Finland – only fully vaccinated people can visit Finland, which implies having received a booster shot within 270 days of the second vaccination. Unvaccinated travelers are not permitted to take non-essential travel. These rules could be abandoned at the end of June.
  • France – although France has relaxed many of its travel restrictions, it has different rules depending on whether a person is vaccinated or not and which country they are traveling from. Most countries are listed in green, from which people can travel for non-essential travel and fully vaccinated travelers can enter without testing requirements.
  • Malta – since June 6 there are no more mandatory quarantine requirements, but anyone arriving in the country must be in possession of a vaccination certificate, a recovery document or a result of negative Covid-19 test.
  • Netherlands – an entry ban is still in place for all travelers arriving from outside the EU/Schengen area to the Netherlands, except those who can prove they are vaccinated or who can present a recovery certificate.
  • Portugal – anyone traveling to mainland Portugal would need proof of vaccination, recovery status or a negative test result. However, Madeira and the Azores have lifted all their restrictions, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Slovakia – Slovak authorities allow visitors with a recovery or vaccination certificate and, in some rarer cases, a negative test result.
  • Spain – the country recently dropped the requirement for travelers coming from inside the EU/Schengen area to present documents relating to their Covid-19 status. However, from outside the EU/EEA region, travelers must show proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result, either a PCR taken within 72 hours or an antigen taken within 48 hours.
]]>
United and Delta will relaunch several flights to Europe https://nomassolo.com/united-and-delta-will-relaunch-several-flights-to-europe/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 13:43:09 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/united-and-delta-will-relaunch-several-flights-to-europe/ Share the article Last update 2 hours ago Aviation industry giants United Airlines and Delta Airlines are set to relaunch several flights to Europe this summer. With entry restrictions eased for most countries on the continent and the desire to travel among American travelers apparently at an all-time high, the two airlines are hoping to […]]]>

Share the article

Last update

Aviation industry giants United Airlines and Delta Airlines are set to relaunch several flights to Europe this summer. With entry restrictions eased for most countries on the continent and the desire to travel among American travelers apparently at an all-time high, the two airlines are hoping to capitalize on strong travel demand, with the new routes featuring some of the hottest in Europe. and the most requested holiday destinations.

For the first time in years, it’s finally looking good for travelers once again, with various airlines in the United States competing to offer a variety of routes both home and beyond that don’t were not available at this time last year. Here’s a rundown of everything we know about the new routes relaunched by United and Delta, including details about the routes and their start dates.

Relaunched Routes – Information for Travelers

Like many airlines in the United States and around the world, the pandemic has forced United and Delta to make tough decisions about their operations. Whether due to strict entry requirements, a critical shortage of airline staff or simply a lack of demand among travelers for the flights, both have been forced to reduce their routes by prioritizing to their flight offers. Fortunately, both airlines are now able to gradually restore their flight networks.

Over the weekend, United restored flights between Newark Airport and Dubrovnik, Croatia, making it the only airline in the country to offer direct flights from the United States to Croatia – one of the most popular travel destinations in the world today. This route will be in service until at least September 29 and will be served by Boeing 767-300s, which can carry up to 214 passengers in total in three classes – United Business, Economy Plus and Economy.

United will also see the number of transatlantic flights offered increase in June. From June 2, three flights per week will connect Newark to Palma de Mallorca in the Balearic Islands, Spain. A week later, on June 9, United will launch direct flights to Tenerife in the Canary Islands, with a frequency of three flights per week. Flights between Newark and Venice began earlier in the month.

There is also good news for those looking to go to Land below. United will resume nonstop service between San Francisco and Melbourne, making it the only US airline to offer a direct flight to the city. These flights will start from June 2 and depart every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. The duration will be 15 hours and 45 minutes, leaving the United States at 10:45 p.m. and landing two days later at 7:30 a.m.

Like United, Delta also restarted direct flights between New York JFK and Venice earlier in the month, as well as flights between Atlanta and Venice. It’s the first time the airline will visit Venice in nearly seven months, with the route already suspended due to the pandemic, making it the perfect time to visit the city’s famous canals and waterways. .

In addition to adding flights to Venice, Delta will also be increasing its transatlantic offerings in a few days. Starting June 1, Delta will launch flights from New York JFK to Stockholm, Sweden. These are in addition to the airline’s new services between Salt Lake City and London Heathrow Airport, which launched just two weeks ago, giving passengers a wealth of transatlantic options to explore this summer. .

Read more:

American Airlines announces new flights but cuts several long-haul routes

Travel insurance that covers Covid-19 for 2022

This airline will start offering flights from New York to London for $116

↓ Join the community ↓

The Travel Off Path Community FB Group has all the latest reopening news, conversations and daily Q&As!

trip-off-road-group-1-1
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR LATEST ARTICLES

Enter your email address to subscribe to the latest travel news from Travel Off Path, straight to your inbox

Disclaimer: Current Travel Rules and Restrictions may change without notice. The decision to travel is ultimately your responsibility. Contact your consulate and/or local authorities to confirm entry of your nationality and/or any changes to travel conditions before travelling. Travel Off Path does not approve travel against government advice

]]>
Europe’s travel and tourism sector is expected to create 8 million new jobs over the next decade, reveals WTTC https://nomassolo.com/europes-travel-and-tourism-sector-is-expected-to-create-8-million-new-jobs-over-the-next-decade-reveals-wttc/ Fri, 13 May 2022 13:26:26 +0000 https://nomassolo.com/europes-travel-and-tourism-sector-is-expected-to-create-8-million-new-jobs-over-the-next-decade-reveals-wttc/ The recent Economic Impact Report (EIR) from the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) reveals that the travel and tourism sector in Europe is expected to create nearly eight million new jobs over the next decade. The WTTC, representing the global travel and tourism private sector, expects the sector to be a driving force in […]]]>

The recent Economic Impact Report (EIR) from the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) reveals that the travel and tourism sector in Europe is expected to create nearly eight million new jobs over the next decade.

The WTTC, representing the global travel and tourism private sector, expects the sector to be a driving force in Europe’s economic recovery after more than two years of suffering as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, reports SchengenVisaInfo.com.

“Over the next ten years and with an average annual growth rate of 3.3%, the travel and tourism sector is expected to grow twice as fast as the overall economy, which is expected to grow by only 1.5% per year. year”, reads a statement released by the WTTC regarding the report.

In addition, the latest report from the global tourism body also reveals that travel and tourism GDP in Europe will grow by 31.4% to €1.73 trillion or US$1.9 trillion.

In this regard, WTTC President and CEO Julia Simpson said that the travel and tourism sector in Europe is recovering strongly.

“In terms of contribution to the economy and jobs in Europe, the sector will almost reach pre-pandemic levels by the end of next year as the sector’s recovery continues to gain momentum,” she also noted.

According to her, due to the spread of the Omicron variant and the closure of borders by European governments, in 2021 the recovery has been slower than expected.

The WTTC also highlighted Europe as the fastest growing region last year. It also saw the sector regain its contribution to GDP with an increase of 28% to represent 6.2% of the European economy at 1.3 trillion euros or 1.45 trillion US dollars against a contribution of 5, 2% in 2020, or just over €1 trillion or US$1.13 trillion.

The main markets where there has been a significant increase are Greece, which increased by 7%, thus favoring the return of Europe, followed by Turkey with 61% and Italy with 59%.

In addition, the World Tourism Organization also praised the European Commission for its key role in the recovery of the sector with the issuance of its digital certificate for COVID last year.

According to the latest data, more than 1.7 billion certificates have been issued by Member States, a very successful distribution and, at the same time, gave a much-needed boost to economies and saved millions of jobs.

Otherwise, there has been a slower recovery in some other European countries due to many desperate attempts by governments to stop the spread of the Omicron variant.

]]>